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Discussion Starter #1
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Ok guys, before you slam me against the wall, it was suggested that I place this build on the forum....sooooooo....here’s the reason.
When my dad was 32, he took me to an old barn in Clinton, SC and there under all the chicken s**t was a 1929 coupe, I was 5 and I remember cleaning it out, dad putting on some tires, installed a battery and we drove it home...I’m now 67. 15 or so years ago my brother took the car, restored it and drove it to a few parades. One night after a case of beer my brother mentioned to build it once again but this time as a drivable rod with modern stuff. About another 6 pack later we had ordered the 2.3l ecoboost package from Ford performance via Summit racing, a chassis package from Brookville roadster, radiator from griffin and a wiring kit from American auto wire. ( most of these are well known in the classic car culture). After flip-flopping on the trans we finally decided on an MT82 ( hey, we’re amateurs) which we believe is enough for the 2.3L.
Since it’s not in a mustang, it became apparent that the driveshaft just wouldn’t work since our rear end is a live axle whereas the mustang uses the solid mounted hog head with the slip joint . Another real sore point was the MT82 output flange, ours is the 3 bolt and we’re not using the rubber doughnut interface between the MT82 flange and the driveshaft. What we finally found was a flanged yoke that we put into a precision CNC marching to drill the three holes to match that 3 bolt output flange. Next we simply went to Carolina driveshafts in Spartanburg, SC and they build a really nice slip joint for the model A.
We’ve also purchased a mishimoto intercooler that gives us better cooling capacity with less pressure drop through the intercooler plus it fits where we had the space. It’s tight under that 1929 hood.
A few photos now....
 

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Discussion Starter #2
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Does anyone know what this connection is ? It seems to come off the middle of the head, maybe a coolant vent?
 

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That's looks really cool! Thanks for sharing and keep up the great work! Cant wait to see it complete!

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
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And what is this connection which is very close to the cam position sensor, maybe the pcv engine connection.
 

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Looks like a fun project! Out of my reach, for sure, even if I had room to work on it. Good luck. Keep the pics coming.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
2498BAAA-9552-4E11-9FFD-D758417D2EC4.jpeg 42A3DE6A-97D7-424E-B485-BD6EA2208A14.jpeg One our other issues was the stock MT82 shifter. Early on we knew that we needed a different shifter that would be closer to the engine due to the small cab of the 1929. I looked at a lot of aftermarket shifters, in my mind expensive, but never really found one that I thought would serve the purpose. Reading about your mustangs there were many common complaints concerning stock shifters, many accolades for the high end aftermarkets and I discovered that there were two different types of stock for the MT82...one had a push down for reverse, the other had a lift ring under the knob for reverse engagement. Since we will need about a 10” extension we decided that the push down for reverse was really the only smart option. Based on your comments and multiple high tech shifters, I decided to cut up the stock one with my goals being to make it short and make it solid to the transmission with virtually no flex in the mounting for solid shifts. First I blew apart the stock shifter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
F1923764-9563-4295-BCD5-61727744FD96.jpeg EB149C86-8359-415C-9D4F-80E569A6D644.jpeg 8A50CE7B-6D52-451E-902B-B1145F7E0B40.jpeg So eventually we cut the output shaft of the shifter, drilled and tapped, installed a threaded rod to connect to a coupling that matches the transmission shifter input rod. It’s getting short now....lol
 

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Amazing project! Following this for sure.
 

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Awesome project
 

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Cam driven vacuum pump for the brakes near the firewall. Mountune sells a vacuum pump delete plate if needed, and maybe others do as well. Metal coolant line above turbo goes to the coolant reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Cam driven vacuum pump for the brakes near the firewall. Mountune sells a vacuum pump delete plate if needed, and maybe others do as well. Metal coolant line above turbo goes to the coolant reservoir.
Thanks a ton!!

Called ford tech today, they sent me a cooling flow diagram
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So, Ford tech sent a cooling flow diagram, our concern was item 11 and thanks to “Ecoboost”, one more connection was made. Ford tech also confirmed the PCV connection on the engine side of the throttle body but not the engine connection which we suspect is that rear connection. Also our pressure regulator sensing port on the intake was confirmed. Getting ready to pull plugs and rotate for oil pressure check.....yes!!!
 

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It lives, it lives!!! After doing a simple plug in of all connectors, jumping the fuel pump relay to adjust regulator pressure, we vented the fuel rails and turned the key...4-5 revolutions and it started right away! Really great! Soooooooo.......we’ve got the PCV issue as seen by the white smoke, so as soon as we complete that modification, I’ll post a video.
 

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Just a little update....thanks to the forum, I’ve been wondering about that cam driven vac pump, anyone know the specs? I sent an email to Ford Performance, no reply yet. As we do not have power brakes, we really don’t need the pump, have even purchased the block off plate but began to wonder if we could use it to assist in eliminating the turbo blow by issue with the oil seals. Any thoughts? My one concern would be that I should at least regulate the max vac we would pull on the crankcase, if we connected a vac regulator between the oil separator to crankcase and the pump, we should clear the issue....so, input guys would be appreciated.
 

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View attachment 30667 View attachment 30665 Ok guys, before you slam me against the wall, it was suggested that I place this build on the forum....sooooooo....here’s the reason.
When my dad was 32, he took me to an old barn in Clinton, SC and there under all the chicken s**t was a 1929 coupe, I was 5 and I remember cleaning it out, dad putting on some tires, installed a battery and we drove it home...I’m now 67. 15 or so years ago my brother took the car, restored it and drove it to a few parades. One night after a case of beer my brother mentioned to build it once again but this time as a drivable rod with modern stuff. About another 6 pack later we had ordered the 2.3l ecoboost package from Ford performance via Summit racing, a chassis package from Brookville roadster, radiator from griffin and a wiring kit from American auto wire. ( most of these are well known in the classic car culture). After flip-flopping on the trans we finally decided on an MT82 ( hey, we’re amateurs) which we believe is enough for the 2.3L.
Since it’s not in a mustang, it became apparent that the driveshaft just wouldn’t work since our rear end is a live axle whereas the mustang uses the solid mounted hog head with the slip joint . Another real sore point was the MT82 output flange, ours is the 3 bolt and we’re not using the rubber doughnut interface between the MT82 flange and the driveshaft. What we finally found was a flanged yoke that we put into a precision CNC marching to drill the three holes to match that 3 bolt output flange. Next we simply went to Carolina driveshafts in Spartanburg, SC and they build a really nice slip joint for the model A.
We’ve also purchased a mishimoto intercooler that gives us better cooling capacity with less pressure drop through the intercooler plus it fits where we had the space. It’s tight under that 1929 hood.
A few photos now....
0CFEC92E-1F04-457E-9F69-2F0C03D36BA8.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
71FB6785-5BEB-4664-BD2C-9BD8F84E5195.jpeg Well guys....back on post #15, I was a little bit naive or FOS.....either way, ford tech came through......soooooo...for those of you doing a crate motor using the ford performance control pack, if you don’t need vacuum for a power booster or other vacuum accessory.....you’ll have to remove the cam driven vac pump since leaving the suction port open will simply pressurize the crankcase...duh.....so was the issue with our turbo blow by. We installed the Mountune block off...which by the way is a beautiful high quality price of hardware... we removed the pump and used a 0.005” strip of plastic as a buffer between the oil return hole in the block and the Mountune plate O-ring in order to protect the O-ring...the plastic was cut from a Dasani water bottle. Once the O-ring slid past the oil return hole, we pulled the plastic out and fully inserted the plate. Maybe I mentioned earlier, we also added the oil separator, gutted the stock pcv and added the check valve. No smoke now!!
 
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