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Yay or nay? I took my car in for oil service few months back and the guy told me he recommended me to get a brake flush. I didn’t do it cuz it sounded like he just wanted to upcharge me... and cuz I’ve never had it done ever in any of my other cars. Anyways! I’ve got about 46k miles and our weather gets pretty humid and cold... wondering whether I really should get this done as preventative.

thoughts? Feedback? I know other car companies recommend every 30k. Ford doesn’t say anything about this in their manual.
 

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I've only flushed a brake system once. And that was after over heating my brakes on country roads and having "pedal fade". I've never heard of it as being part of dealership maintenance on a street car.
Now a road racing track car is probably a story.
 

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It is recommended by Ford to change the brake fluid every 2 years in the Mustang.
Having said that, even most dealership service departments don't do it correctly, and take the 'lazy' way of doing it. (But still charge you).
They simply syphon out as much of the fluid in the brake reservoir and then refill with new fluid.
To change the fluid properly, the fluid needs to be also changed in the brake lines, starting from the longest brake line to the shortest from the reservoir.
 

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It is a good idea, however it must be done properly as @Go Further stated, bled through from the master out to the calipers. If you do this regularly (every 2-3 years is good), you will extend the life of your hydraulic components. If you have the ability to put the entire up at once you can simply gravity bleed by opening all bleed screws at once and keeping the master topped up until you get clean fluid at each corner. Alternatively, you can purchase a pressure bleeder.
 

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I get it done on my car, mostly because of track/autocross time. As a matter of fact it's due again in August before my next track night.
 

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I get it done on my car, mostly because of track/autocross time. As a matter of fact it's due again in August before my next track night.
Like @zhent ... I track my car and swap brake fluid annually or if it gets dark.

Even just sucking the old fluid out of the reservoir and replacing it with new is a good thing and you can do it at home with an inexpensive tool from Harbor freight. a couple of changes over a few weeks will have all the fluid pretty much changed.
 

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Yay or nay? I took my car in for oil service few months back and the guy told me he recommended me to get a brake flush. I didn’t do it cuz it sounded like he just wanted to upcharge me... and cuz I’ve never had it done ever in any of my other cars. Anyways! I’ve got about 46k miles and our weather gets pretty humid and cold... wondering whether I really should get this done as preventative.

thoughts? Feedback? I know other car companies recommend every 30k. Ford doesn’t say anything about this in their manual.
Brake fluid flushes are totally legit. Brake fluid, by nature, is "hygroscopic," which means it absorbs moisture from the air. The problem with that is that, with moisture content, the boiling point of the fluid is reduced. That means, brake fade could happen. Additionally, moisture in the ABS modulator could wreak havoc with your brake system. There are tools that can be dipped into the fluid, to test for moisture content. They're not expensive and can be had on Amazon. An additional note is that the newer Mustang calls for a DOT 4 LV fluid. The LV stands for low viscosity. Evidently, the LV fluid provides better pedal feel in colder weather.
 
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Moxman has it right: you should replace the brake fluid on a regular schedule. Should you do it every time you change the oil? No. I do it when I replace the brakes. You're already down there working around the calipers anyway, so it doesn't add that much to the $time$.

As noted, to do it properly you need to get the fluid out of the lines as well. I would add that if you don't do that you're really wasting your time. The fluid in the system doesn't cycle; it stays pretty much where it's at the entire time it's in the system. That means the fluid nearest the calipers experiences all the heat generated by the brake system. That's all your brakes do, really, is convert the energy of a moving 3800 lb object to heat. It's really critical to get at least the fluid in the last foot or so of brake line feeding each caliper out of the system every time you replace the brakes. It's really easy to do yourself using this tool from Harbor Freight. The only drawback to this tool is you need access to an air compressor to use it. If you can't find an air compressor then your best bet is have a pro do it. Just make sure to specify you expect them to replace ALL the fluid in the system, not just in the reservoir. Here's a video of the procedure using the Harbor Freight tool:

 

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Yay or nay? I took my car in for oil service few months back and the guy told me he recommended me to get a brake flush. I didn’t do it cuz it sounded like he just wanted to upcharge me... and cuz I’ve never had it done ever in any of my other cars. Anyways! I’ve got about 46k miles and our weather gets pretty humid and cold... wondering whether I really should get this done as preventative.

thoughts? Feedback? I know other car companies recommend every 30k. Ford doesn’t say anything about this in their manual.
Brake fluid is hydroscopic, which means it absorbs water from the atmosphere. And that water turns corrosive in the brake fluid and can cause pitting of the metals and sludging. When I worked on Ford's in the early 1970's, we had lots of corrosion in wheel cylinders and calipers. Often leading to replacing them, because the corrosion was too deep to hone out. If we had known this in then, we might have stopped much of that corrosion.

I didn't find out about this until I went to working on Nissan's and eventually Infiniti's. And I still do 50 years later. The irony is, the retirement benefit for working as a tech guru for 6 years is paying for my Mustang.
 
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