Ford Mustang Ecoboost Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm quite confused on the base of these 2, I lack knowledge of both. What's needed? I'm at 64k miles and just started kinda modding the car after warranty died. I see a lot of people gutting the pcv is that necessary. I'm on a 93 tune, CAI, and axle back system. I plan on putting an intercooler on very soon from cvf and possibly tuning to e30 maybe. I just need to know what to do to keep my eco good and need more knowledge about this topic.
 

· Registered
2016 Mustang Ecoboost, 6-speed manual, premium
Joined
·
96 Posts
Gutting the pcv is news to me...but anyway. Catch can is a good "maintenance mod." It doesn't improve performance, but acts like a filter for the dirty air your engine will recirculation inside itself. In high pressure turbo motors like ours, the cleaner you can keep the inside the better! What's needed? A quality catch can with factory fittings like a JLT 3.0, jack stands, screw driver/pliers, and some patience.
Diverter valve is basically a blow off valve that releases some of the excess turbo boost air back i to the intake system. Its quieter than a traditional blow off valve and some argue its performance vs a traditional blow off valve. Diverter valve mod is a cheaper way to improve the performance of the stock blow off valve by replacing the cheap factory plastic housing and weaker spring with a nice aluminum housing and better spring while keeping factory function. What's needed? Simple socket set or maybe some torqs bits depending on what bolts/screws the diverter comes with, maybe a screw driver to undo an air clamp.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
I gutted my PCV Check Valve due to failure. And installed an aftermarket check valve.
Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Font

Cable Auto part Font Tool Electronics accessory

I also had minor bypass leakage, when pushing 20lb+ boost and replaced it with an aftermarket plumb back valve.
Gas Font Rectangle Paint Bumper
 

· Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
There are various good aftermarket solutions for a diverter or blow-off valve. GFB makes a good piece that uses the OEM solenoid (2017 to mid 2018) and replaces the rest, both bypass and vent to atmosphere (VTA) versions available. Boomba Racing also makes a version that provides a special solenoid valve that leverages vacuum and boost pressure to either open or hold closed the provided high psi valve. Both retain the PCM control of the valve. The response is quicker with the PCM controlled valve versus going to a vacuum/boost controlled version like TiAL, HKS, GReddy, etc... I've run a gamut of the various bypass and VTA valves, and while neither IMHO is better than the other from a performance standpoint, I favor the VTA's as I like the sound. Out of all the ones I have installed, I like the Boomba Racing VTA (currently running 2022) and GFB VTA (previous 2018) valves the most.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
I'm gonna go with a dv valve just don't like the sound on the blow off, could you send a link?
Here is a link to the GFB BPV. Just verify you have the correct OEM BV for this part since I believe only the one with the yellow o-ring for 2015 to early 2018 will work. Somewhere in 2018, they changed to a one-piece valve with an orange o-ring that cannot be gutted to work with this part. You can also search Boomba Racing or TurboSmart for other PCM controlled alternatives.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
I added a J&L catch can to my system and did not gut the stock PCV but did install a UPR 100 psi check valve 2" from the intake connection of the J&L can. So, my PCV valve is basically just along for the ride since the UPR check valve overrides any pressure/vacuum signals the PCV valve will ever see. It has worked perfect now for over 5000 miles.

I would recommend the GFB DV+ kit, especially if you have the 15-mid18 BPV with the yellow o ring.

Go Fast Bits Mercedes Diverter Blow off Valve Go Fast Bits DV+ GFB T9358 | Discount Bandit

BD
 

· Registered
2020 Ford Mustang Ecoboost Base Velocity Blue A10
Joined
·
40 Posts
Definitely get a catch can and the good news is there are many quality options, just be sure to get one that has a check valve built in or you can put in in line check valve. It’s hard to bet against Turbosmart for a diverter valve for the money with Go Fast Bits a close second, just be sure if you in the future you plan on changing out your stock hot side intercooler pipe you get one that fits that upgrade so you aren’t having to buy twice.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
A catch can is almost a must have, if your going to push your Ecoboost Mustang past normal boost levels.
From what I understand, our combustion system is designed to be more efficient than a normal performance engine. As a result fuel, and oil can pass between the combustion chambers and crankcase, especially under higher than normal boost.
Without a catch can, your PCV system will allow the crankcase vapor to be pulled into the intake air stream to be burnt during future combustion cycles.
Under normal boost conditions, this isn't a problem, but the higher we push our boost level, the higher our combustion chamber pressures increase, which leads to blow-by and higher than desired crankcase pressure, etc. etc...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
A catch can is almost a must have, if your going to push your Ecoboost Mustang past normal boost levels.
From what I understand, our combustion system is designed to be more efficient than a normal performance engine. As a result fuel, and oil can pass between the combustion chambers and crankcase, especially under higher than normal boost.
Without a catch can, your PCV system will allow the crankcase vapor to be pulled into the intake air stream to be burnt during future combustion cycles.
Under normal boost conditions, this isn't a problem, but the higher we push our boost level, the higher our combustion chamber pressures increase, which leads to blow-by and higher than desired crankcase pressure, etc. etc...
This is all spot on and is why a catch can is so important and beneficial to have on our cars. Also adding a crankcase one way breather is another must have to help reduce/relieve excess positive pressure from the crankcase when under boost.

Billet One-Way Valve Cover Crankcase Breather Kit - Eliminate Crankcase Pressure | eBay

BD
 

· Registered
2016 ecoboost premium
Joined
·
275 Posts
There are various good aftermarket solutions for a diverter or blow-off valve. GFB makes a good piece that uses the OEM solenoid (2017 to mid 2018) and replaces the rest, both bypass and vent to atmosphere (VTA) versions available. Boomba Racing also makes a version that provides a special solenoid valve that leverages vacuum and boost pressure to either open or hold closed the provided high psi valve. Both retain the PCM control of the valve. The response is quicker with the PCM controlled valve versus going to a vacuum/boost controlled version like TiAL, HKS, GReddy, etc... I've run a gamut of the various bypass and VTA valves, and while neither IMHO is better than the other from a performance standpoint, I favor the VTA's as I like the sound. Out of all the ones I have installed, I like the Boomba Racing VTA (currently running 2022) and GFB VTA (previous 2018) valves the most.

can second that the GFB vta is great. altho it works on 2015 - mid 2018 cars. solved my problem of the stock one getting stuck.

but if you want to go the cheap route the blow off valve adaptors are good too i ran the steeda blow of valve adaptor for about a year and the sound really adds to the car
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
This is all spot on and is why a catch can is so important and beneficial to have on our cars. Also adding a crankcase one way breather is another must have to help reduce/relieve excess positive pressure from the crankcase when under boost.

Billet One-Way Valve Cover Crankcase Breather Kit - Eliminate Crankcase Pressure | eBay

BD
BD, you your post always makes me think!!
I have the same vent with built in check valve as you do, and also recommend installing one. Which lead me down to my shop in search of the vented catch can from my last build. The vent on that thing didn't have a check valve! Now I know why I newer caught any contamination... so to confirm what you stated in an earlier post, check valves are important and need to be installed correctly, in the correct location!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
BD, you your post always makes me think!!
I have the same vent with built in check valve as you do, and also recommend installing one. Which lead me down to my shop in search of the vented catch can from my last build. The vent on that thing didn't have a check valve! Now I know why I newer caught any contamination... so to confirm what you stated in an earlier post, check valves are important and need to be installed correctly, in the correct location!
Yes, they are important and serve a very useful purpose. But if not installed correctly or absent from the system that should have one then you can end up with the situation you just stated. Certainly would explain never collecting any oil residue since it never saw a negative pressure.

If used on a catch can that is intended to vent to atmosphere if pressurized, then it would indeed need a check valve to control when it is allowed to vent. In the case of a vented catch can that has no check valve in the vent then it can never truly create a sealed system that allows for a vacuum to be encountered since it would be venting all the time in negative and positive pressure ranges, only if the catch can has a check valve built in would just a filter be appropriate.

BD
 
  • Like
Reactions: Coyote Chaser

· Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes, they are important and serve a very useful purpose. But if not installed correctly or absent from the system that should have one then you can end up with the situation you just stated. Certainly would explain never collecting any oil residue since it never saw a negative pressure.

If used on a catch can that is intended to vent to atmosphere if pressurized, then it would indeed need a check valve to control when it is allowed to vent. In the case of a vented catch can that has no check valve in the vent then it can never truly create a sealed system that allows for a vacuum to be encountered since it would be venting all the time in negative and positive pressure ranges, only if the catch can has a check valve built in would just a filter be appropriate.

BD
Would a c&l oil seperator be fine to run? or should I be looking at something like the J&L catch can?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
Would a c&l oil seperator be fine to run? or should I be looking at something like the J&L catch can?
Got link to C&L separator.

BD
 

· Registered
2016 ecoboost premium
Joined
·
275 Posts
Wait I’m confused now. My catch can has no vent or anything like that but works a treat for removing oil. It’s an internally baffled mishimoto knock off that’s spliced in between the pcv lines on the drivers side of the engine. Usually empty it every oil change and it has about a half inch or more of oil in the canister.

I do need to add a vent like the ones you guys mention on the oil cap but I don’t see why the catch can would need to have a vent on it. Does it not just filter out the oil that the car it trying to recirculate back into the intake? The image below is my catch can setup.

Automotive tire Tire Tread Hood Motor vehicle
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
Wait I’m confused now. My catch can has no vent or anything like that but works a treat for removing oil. It’s an internally baffled mishimoto knock off that’s spliced in between the pcv lines on the drivers side of the engine. Usually empty it every oil change and it has about a half inch or more of oil in the canister.

I do need to add a vent like the ones you guys mention on the oil cap but I don’t see why the catch can would need to have a vent on it. Does it not just filter out the oil that the car it trying to recirculate back into the intake?
Catch can does not need to have a vent on it but I believe that UPR sells one that does have a filter/vent but unsure if it has a one way check valve. Your catch can setup is fine although I am not willing to trust the factory PCV valve alone to prevent any turbo boost from getting past it and pressurizing the crankcase when under boost so I also added a UPR 100 psi check valve in the intake side of the line of my J&L catch can 2" from the intake quick connect. So, my PCV valve is pretty much non functional and only serves as the connection point for the engine side of the catch can line.

Hope that clears things up for you.

BD
 
  • Like
Reactions: hiddenpants

· Registered
2016 ecoboost premium
Joined
·
275 Posts
Catch can does not need to have a vent on it but I believe that UPR sells one that does have a filter/vent but unsure if it has a one way check valve. Your catch can setup is fine although I am not willing to trust the factory PCV valve alone to prevent any turbo boost from getting past it and pressurizing the crankcase when under boost so I also added a UPR 100 psi check valve in the intake side of the line of my J&L catch can 2" from the intake quick connect. So, my PCV valve is pretty much non functional and only serves as the connection point for the engine side of the catch can line.

Hope that clears things up for you.

BD
It does clear things up thanks. Does adding that valve affect anything else or is it just an extra layer of safety? Like would it need to be tuned for or is just slapping it in the inlet line good enough? Do you have a gutted pcv?
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top