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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello - at one point (wished I saved the link), I saw a study that suggested that catch cans are NOT that helpful. That (1) most of the liquid is actually condensation and (2) driving with a recent amount of acceleration is enough to burn off most of any errant oil. Does anyone have that link?

Thanks!!!
 

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Sorry, don't know the site...
For normal driving, your probably right, a catch can isn't necessarily needed. I have one, mostly for future troubleshooting and protection from contamination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As I understand it, it adds more maintenance / effort even for an oil change? How do you empty / dispose of the oil, etc.?
 

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The bottom just screws off like an oil filter and then I have some empty oil cans I can label and ship for testing. So far I haven't had any oil in my catch can.
 

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It's hard to quantify how much they help but the fact that I collect about 1/2 oz every month and more in the winter makes it worth while for me. In the winter there is definitely condensation, it separates from the oil and quite often freezes, I do not see the separation during the summer.

As far as maintenance, it's a no brainer for me the catch can I have had on the last three Ecoboost engined vehicles have a thumb wheel fastener that mounts it to the bracket and quick connect hose fittings so it takes less than a minute to remove and I dump the contents into the drain pan all my used oil hoes into before returning it for recycling.

I am quite sure the reason they factory doesn't install them is they require tempting and if they are not it could result in catostrophic failure if a slug of oil is sucked into the engine. I suppose they could design one that automatically drained back to the pan but the benefit likely does not warrant the cost.

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I don't race and my car is mostly a daily driver for my wife. I do get into the boost when I drive though so I wanted to keep the oil from cooking onto the back side of the intake valves and gumming up the exhaust side of the turbo. I have the Mishimoto can on my car and I check it once every couple of months and never have had more than a 1/4 inch of oil in the bottom. I started putting some of my Wife's makeup removing little round pads in the bottom (they fit perfect) to keep slosh down and once the oil hits them, it stays put. Easy clean out with a paper towel and just toss the soaked pads and paper towels in a little plastic bag into the trash. 😁
 

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I don't race and my car is mostly a daily driver for my wife. I do get into the boost when I drive though so I wanted to keep the oil from cooking onto the back side of the intake valves and gumming up the exhaust side of the turbo. I have the Mishimoto can on my car and I check it once every couple of months and never have had more than a 1/4 inch of oil in the bottom. I started putting some of my Wife's makeup removing little round pads in the bottom (they fit perfect) to keep slosh down and once the oil hits them, it stays put. Easy clean out with a paper towel and just toss the soaked pads and paper towels in a little plastic bag into the trash. 😁
Now THAT is a great idea. Thanks for passing it along.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi - trying to post again in search of a scientific study that I saw once I believe in this forum. The study concluded that actually a catch can is NOT needed, since when the engine is run as designed (higher RPMs), any minor amount of oil is burnt off. And that most of the "oil" people collect is actually condensation. Does anyone know where that link is? THANKS!
 

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Hi - trying to post again in search of a scientific study that I saw once I believe in this forum. The study concluded that actually a catch can is NOT needed, since when the engine is run as designed (higher RPMs), any minor amount of oil is burnt off. And that most of the "oil" people collect is actually condensation. Does anyone know where that link is? THANKS!
It's true the oil that makes it into the combustion chamber burns just like the fuel does. The problem is all the things it coats with that blowby oil as it's finding its way there. It has to go through the intake manifold, making it a sticky mess and then around the intake valves. RIGHT THERE is a big problem for that oily moisture mix when it hits the back side of the hot intake valves. It STICKS and cooks onto the back side and valve stems just like all the juice on a steak cooks onto your charcoal grill. It can get thick enough to restrict air flow and direction so as to cause poor fuel air mixing in the cylinders. The old style injectors were mounted in the intake manifold and squirted into the back side of the valves to keep the oil washed off and also hitting the back side of the valves helped vaporize the fuel and cool them at the same time. The new direct injectors squirt into the cylinders UNDER the intake valves, so there is nothing coming through the manifold to keep the valves washed clean....only air, and whatever contamination that air carries with it. That's where the extra filtering of a catch can has benefits. It captures that moist vapor/oil mix before it can reach the intake manifold and valves, and make a carbon/charcoal baked on mess of your valves. The moisture isn't much of a problem as it mostly just evaporates away or is run through the engine and out the exhaust. When it mixes with oil vapor and is pushed into the cylinders under boost, it can actually ignite under that pressure just like oil vapor does in a diesel and BANG, you have Dieseling pre-ignition knock that can break stuff like ring lands and piston tops!
 

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It's true the oil that makes it into the combustion chamber burns just like the fuel does. The problem is all the things it coats with that blowby oil as it's finding its way there. It has to go through the intake manifold, making it a sticky mess and then around the intake valves. RIGHT THERE is a big problem for that oily moisture mix when it hits the back side of the hot intake valves. It STICKS and cooks onto the back side and valve stems just like all the juice on a steak cooks onto your charcoal grill. It can get thick enough to restrict air flow and direction so as to cause poor fuel air mixing in the cylinders. The old style injectors were mounted in the intake manifold and squirted into the back side of the valves to keep the oil washed off and also hitting the back side of the valves helped vaporize the fuel and cool them at the same time. The new direct injectors squirt into the cylinders UNDER the intake valves, so there is nothing coming through the manifold to keep the valves washed clean....only air, and whatever contamination that air carries with it. That's where the extra filtering of a catch can has benefits. It captures that moist vapor/oil mix before it can reach the intake manifold and valves, and make a carbon/charcoal baked on mess of your valves. The moisture isn't much of a problem as it mostly just evaporates away or is run through the engine and out the exhaust. When it mixes with oil vapor and is pushed into the cylinders under boost, it can actually ignite under that pressure just like oil vapor does in a diesel and BANG, you have Dieseling pre-ignition knock that can break stuff like ring lands and piston tops!
How many Ford 2.3L Ecoboost engines have you actually come across that have had any significant carbon build up on the intake valves? I've looked and looked, and I've found 1. Conversely, I've found numerous examples of this engine, with over 100,000 miles and no oil catch can, that have had no issues with carbon build up the intake valves.
 

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^ this ^

Reminds me of the HICAS and ATTESA arguments that still rage on in the Skyline community.

It works and it works extremely well when everything is sound the problem is most suspension on these cars are shot to **** with warn bushings and struts that HICAS is desperately trying to counter. Then you have those that simply don't understand it, correct with a fist full if opposite lock and a boot full of boost and ditch it. Of course too save face they blame the HICAS, never that they run out of talent behind the wheel of a 300 plus BHP car.

Then you have the drifters. Everyone like a bit of drifting.
 

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I had no catch can for 5 year/40k miles because I was on the OEM tune.

When I got the ECU flashed I also installed a JLT 3.0 catch can because the increase in torque will increase blow-by and contaminate the air intake with sludge at a time when Octane is critical. Blow-by can lower the Octane rating causing detonation events that IMO can lead to the dreaded Ecoboom.

This is 2k miles worth of sluge so I'd recommend a catch can when ECU flashing at a minimum.

I also had the air/fuel induction cleaning at 40k miles to clean the carbon from the system prior to flashing and installing the catch can. After the service black soot came out of the tail pipes and fouled out my O2 sensors so there was apparently a good amount of carbon built up after 40k miles.

40246
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OKay dumb question maybe. I've got about 45K miles. If I get a borescope and take a look at the valves (I have no idea what effort is involved), what that at least tell me if I should have gotten a catch can and/or whether I should do a cleaning? Has anyone done that with about that same mileage? (It would be especially cool if we had two people borescope similar mileage cars... one with and one without a catch can).
 

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What do you guys think of this in lieu of a catch can…

What do you guys think of this in lieu of a catch can…

The problem with running carbon cleaners through a turbo engine is that the carbon that doesn't solve can damage the turbo, and the cleaner itself could potentially damage the O2 sensors and catalytic converter. I have no catch can, because I don't think they're necessary on this engine. If I have a problem with carbon, on the intake valves, I'll remove the intake manifold, and with the cylinder on top dead center, so the valves are closed, I'll spray a carbon cleaner on the valves, and clean out the mess with a rag. The intake manifold comes off really easy, on this engine, like most inline 4 cylinders.
 

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OKay dumb question maybe. I've got about 45K miles. If I get a borescope and take a look at the valves (I have no idea what effort is involved), what that at least tell me if I should have gotten a catch can and/or whether I should do a cleaning? Has anyone done that with about that same mileage? (It would be especially cool if we had two people borescope similar mileage cars... one with and one without a catch can).
If your car runs well, then you don't have excessive carbon buildup, on your intake valves. The typical first symptom, of excessive carbon, is the car running rough on a cold day, when you first start it up, then it smooths out after the engine is warmed up. Again, this isn't common on our engine. It was common on the early 3.5L Ecoboost, but Ford made some design changes, with our engine, and the latest API SN+ and SP oils have addressed this.
 
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