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Discussion Starter #1
I started moaning the end of December that the amount of blow by was through the roof. Been filling a jug and have drained about 24 ounces since December 28, 2017. I had it in my head then, head gasket but the past months have been cold as dirt so I sort of figured/hoped that was it.

Yesterday and today, I've noticed smoke from my tail pipe. I've seen wisps in the rear view but only the past two days have been clearly searching for it. I've got smoke smoke after the car is warm. Made a (an easy) 100 mile run to my parents house, left the car running and had an entry level Sandford and Son going on. Even had my mother in her late 70s aka June Cleaver, even comment that doesn't look right.

I'm a bolt on guy and good general mechanic but this is out of my experience. I'm assuming I need to have the compression checked to confirm my suspicions. If my suspicions are confirmed; a lot of you guys are techs in the real world. Any cost guesses on a head gasket replacement. Car runs strong so I'm thinking no damage other than some leakage. Looking for some comfort in realistic guess or some really rose colored glasses rhetoric.
 

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I have no idea what the cost on an ecoboost would be on the headgasket. Used to be around $1600 in most shops. I know if mine goes, I know I would have it done by a Ford Dealer. Not many shops are up to date on these engines. Some of the performance shops also would know these engines.
 

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The first thing you need to do is a pressure test on the cooling system. This will determine is there is a leak, either internal or external, in the cooling system. Depending on the nature of the leak, you will know which course of action to take. If the leak is internal, most likely, the head gasket will need to be replaced. The Mustang engine isn't known for head gasket failures as much as the Ecoboost engine in the Focus RS is. Evidently, these two engines do not share the same head gasket and some of the RSs got fitted with the Mustang head gasket, which led to premature failure. Suffice it to say that, it would be a good idea to get a handle on the cooling system pressure and make a decision from there.

If, in fact, the head gasket needs to be replaced, you should strongly consider upgrading the head bolts to the stud kit offered by ARP fasteners. The Focus RS community has fully embraced this as a great way to ensure the integrity of the replacement head gasket.
 

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Anywhere from $ 800 to $3,000 if you cant do it yourself . Hopefully it's only the head gasket like @Moxman said and not detonation in cylinder heads ( cylinder 3 )that may have caused the head to lift. Worst case scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
People always say, "thanks for the input" but I really sincerely want to thank everyone for their input. Took it to the local dealer this morning. They say the turbo impeller seals are failing. AKA - $2300 if they do it. I'm feeling that, assuming their diagnosis is accurate, this is something I could do. Which leaves me with four questions.

1) This is out of the realm of my wrench-ary but how do you diagnose failing impeller seals? As in, is this a guess or likely a sure enough diagnosis by the tech that I can take it as accurate and move on with dropping larger chunks of money at the problem? The only thing worse than a $2k repair would be a $2k unnecessary repair.

2) Dealer gave me the power train warranty speel and that having a tuner would affect cams, pressure etc subsequently putting additional pressure on the impeller seal causing it to fail and they've never seen an impeller seal fail before; blah blah blah. I'm definitely calling Ford to check but any Ford techs out there have pointers/input for me on this? It's clearly worth the call but should I push and how far?

3) Assuming the diagnosis is correct and Ford won't warranty. How challenging could it really be to swap in a new turbo in my garage? Am I underestimating here and foolishly thinking it's all a self contained unit; mount one side to the exhaust manifold and other to down pipe and charge pipe? Rebuilding I could see but I'm visualizing this as a very expensive bolt on since all the stuff is there from the failing unit.

4) Upgraded turbo? While enticing, it means dyno tune, I'm assuming new down pipe, charge pipe; basically more money, lots of parts on a "fun car" not a dedicated "track car." Thoughts?
 

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Just an FYI: It is normal for a small amount of combustion gas to pass into the crankcase. This gas is scavenged into the air intake system through the PCV system, which incorporates an crankcase vent oil separator. Some engine oil, in the form of a vapor is carried into the air intake system with the blow-by gases (this engine oil also contributes to valve seat durability). This means that oil will collect inside the air intake components and the turbocharger. The turbocharger oil seal will generally not fail unless the bearings fail first, which will cause the turbocharger to become noisy or seize. Do not install a new turbocharger due to oil inside the turbocharger or the air intake components. If a leak is detected in the oil supply or return tubes or connections, locate and rectify the source. Do not install a new turbocharger due to an oil leak.
 

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If their diagnosis is accurate and the turbo does need replacing, according to Ford it's only a 3 hour repair. Very much a manageable DIY job.
 

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If it is a seal failure, (sounds correct) you can repair it yourself. Not a terrible job at all. Some turbos can be repaired, and they sell repair kits for them. If there is any doubt, just replace it. You can find used turbo from wrecked cars from LKQ, engines and transmissions also.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
So, order of action: Tonight, drinks for the wife. She is unpleased with me right now and my long list of faults which I alone am responsible for and ever blessed that she is tolerant of. A couple of Ocean Trust martinis at Bone Fish helps too. Tomorrow am, pending spousal approval, I'm thinking of hitting up the dealer out of town where I bought my car and see if their diagnostics come to same conclusion. Maybe they'll be more accommodating as far as warranting it. If not, my plan was to order part #6K682 off of Turbocharger Assy | FordUS. But after seeing the good and wise Elvis' post, I may take a chance with the used Turbo.
 

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Not a bad choice, just keep in mind that buying a turbo directly from Ford carries a 2 year unlimited mile warranty and it's brand new. If your pressed for cash and the used turbo doesn't seem too beat up or have an ungodly amount of miles on it then I would go that route.
 

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Not a bad choice, just keep in mind that buying a turbo directly from Ford carries a 2 year unlimited mile warranty and it's brand new. If your pressed for cash and the used turbo doesn't seem too beat up or have an ungodly amount of miles on it then I would go that route.
LKQ lists the miles on the engine it takes the turbo off of.
 

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The diagnosis of this malady is pretty straightforward. First, a visual inspection of the type and amount of smoke coming out of the exhaust will need to be done. This will confirm whether it's oil or coolant getting into the exhaust. After that, a pressure test of the cooling system to determine its integrity should be performed. If the diagnosis leads to oil smoke, then the engine will need to be checked to make sure the rings and/or valve guide seals are not leaking. This can be accomplished by a compression and cylinder leak-down test and a visual inspection of the spark plugs. If there is no hint of oil on the plugs and compression is good, then the turbo is suspect. At this point, it may be necessary to replace the turbo. I favor replacing turbos with brand new units, whenever possible. Yeah...there are places that rebuild them and kits to rebuild them, but they just never seem to be as good as new replacements. I was quite surprised to see the Ecoboost turbo priced at just a tick under $1,000! Most turbos are $1,500 and up. If you have to fit a used one, inspect it very carefully before buying. Also, try to determine the mileage on the engine the turbo came off of.

As far as changing it out yourself, it looks like a pretty easy swap. If the flat-rate labor for the job is only three hours, you should have no problem doing it. It also looks as though all of the fasteners are pretty routine, so special tools would not be necessary.

Keep us posted on the outcome of this ongoing saga...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The new vs used argument is a valid one. The wife I think is open (to about anything now that she is properly martini-ed up). I'm gonna hope for the best at the Richmond dealer where I bought the car and push a bit if they deny. I need to go practice in front of the mirror now. "A tune?? No Sir, I do not sing. I don't understand what do you mean by 'a tune'??" New chapter to follow mañana.
 

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"Tune? No, tunes are fine, it's a great stereo, I'm worried about the engine, not the sound system."
 

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Is this "part #6K682 off of Turbocharger Assy | FordUS" a new turbo or a Ford reman? Usually new parts don't have a core charge, that's why I ask, and $997.00 for a "new" turbo is pretty inexpensive.
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #19
"Suprise" is checked into the lot and will be sitting until Tuesday when they get to it. That's one way to take the fire out of ya. They must have seen me walk in mumbling "no, no tune. No. no. tune..."
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Update and then I ran across a new perspective. Dealer #2 told me I had so much done to the car they weren't doing anything beyond check for fittings being tight. I won't get into the back and forth the service manager and I had but his position was we're not even going to pursue any warranty and I could take it up with Ford if I wasn't satisfied. Once he understood that I was looking for a true technical opinion rather than a warranty dance. "Dude before I drop a grand, I'm just looking for you guys to pressure test the cooling system and do a compression check so it won't be a completely blind jump. He ended up saying, it's definitely the turbo impeller seals. I wasn't happy that dealer #2 made the same diagnosis in the same way as dealer #1, off the cuff.

Here's where the fun starts. So surfing Youtube I ran across the "smoke issue" 2015 Ecoboost cars are having secondary to the PCV.


The video here, at the 1:10 second mark is exactly what I'm seeing with my car. I also ran across some old thread talking about lower back pressure keeps the turbo seals from mating. Thinking about the video and that is exactly what I'm seeing; gonna assume for now both dealers are wrong (especially as neither did anything beyond make a guess.) I ended up at adamtuned looking at the UPR catch can coupled with his gutting the PCV valve. Car at home, intake removed to access the PCV baffle plate to gut the PCV and bang, I broke the outer ring holding the PCV valve in.

Frustrated; it's time to throw money at the problem and hope it all doesn't disappear into the wind. Gonna do some house hold chores then come back and order:

Radium Engineering PCV Baffle Plate for Ecoboost Engines
UPR Dual Valve Catch Can (2015+ Ecoboost Mustang "SMOKE FIX")

Angry logic but hoping this won't be $400 out the window. Any thoughts?
 
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