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You already know my views on this, but I'll mention it for others. I'm in the minority that I like more rear camber on these cars than front. I do not however track my car. If I did, I would run a conventional setup like Squid. I started with more front camber and I didn't like the way it felt on the street. Adding more rear camber made it more stable, plus I was trying to tuck 325's in the rear fenders. On your oem list, you'll notice the gt350's are the only ones running more front camber, I'm assuming because they are "dedicated" track cars and not "street" cars like ours. I split the difference between the oem numbers and the ford performance numbers. I love where its at right now. It works for me. It may not for everyone else though. This is speculation on my part, but I believe camber on these cars is not nearly as important as the toe figures are. Toe figures on these s550's is what will eat up your tires (to an extent). You can run some pretty aggressive cambers without a lot of tire wear (again to an extent). I think camber settings are a lot of personal preference. More front will give you quicker turn in (feel loose), more rear will give you less turn in (feels tight). For me, I like the tighter feeling, but again, I'm not on the track every weekend. Hope my dribble makes a little sense ha.

To answer the question, I'm at roughly -1.3 in the front and -1.7 in the rear.
You guys are literally splitting a single degree. Apologize if this question is dumb, but is there really that much difference in response and handling by adjusting camber by half a degree or ONE whole degree? It's going to make a noticeable difference?? I was thinking the camber on a one inch drop was mainly for tire life, up and until now. Thanks!
 

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If you autocross or track the car, then YES, a change of even half a degree can change the response and handling. One degree is actually a huge change and very noticeable in really aggressive driving.

Of course none of this is necessary or noticeable if you're a straight line only drag strip racer. There you'd only want to make sure it's going straight...
 
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You guys are literally splitting a single degree. Apologize if this question is dumb, but is there really that much difference in response and handling by adjusting camber by half a degree or ONE whole degree? It's going to make a noticeable difference?? I was thinking the camber on a one inch drop was mainly for tire life, up and until now. Thanks!
I will agree with zhent it can absolutely make a difference. I’ll have to dig through the pictures, might be in my build thread. When I first dropped mine then had it aligned, the rear looked awful. I don’t know if they got a bad measurement or if something shifted/settled, but when I went back in the one rear wheel was only at -.6. It stuck out of the fender terrible. I had them throw another degree at it to come to -1.6 or so and it’s perfect now.

So much of this front vs rear measurement is a lot of how YOU want the car to drive. I don’t think there is really a wrong way as long as it’s reasonable. A lot of it is just preference on how you like to corner, unless as stated above, your a track guy. In that case your just about always gonna run front heavy camber.


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If you autocross or track the car, then YES, a change of even half a degree can change the response and handling. One degree is actually a huge change and very noticeable in really aggressive driving.

Of course none of this is necessary or noticeable if you're a straight line only drag strip racer. There you'd only want to make sure it's going straight...
Gotcha. That being said, I haven't autocrossed the car yet, but might when I get new tires just to have some real fun with it finally; but you think I would feel a difference with a one inch drop, and the right camber adjustment when I'm on a twisty road or when I'm taking a long curve if I'm being heavy on the throttle?
 

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I will agree with zhent it can absolutely make a difference. I’ll have to dig through the pictures, might be in my build thread. When I first dropped mine then had it aligned, the rear looked awful. I don’t know if they got a bad measurement or if something shifted/settled, but when I went back in the one rear wheel was only at -.6. It stuck out of the fender terrible. I had them throw another degree at it to come to -1.6 or so and it’s perfect now.

So much of this front vs rear measurement is a lot of how YOU want the car to drive. I don’t think there is really a wrong way as long as it’s reasonable. A lot of it is just preference on how you like to corner, unless as stated above, your a track guy. In that case your just about always gonna run front heavy camber.


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I do like whipping around a corner, or the ability to EASILY pass people on the outside of a hard, long curve. The subframe braces have been miracle workers in that regard. Whereas before, any mild oversteer coupled with hard throttle and it would be fishtail city, I REALLY have to TRY to be able to break the car loose on the back after the braces went in. Its the main reason that I thought that a one inch center of gravity drop with these springs, would also benefit me in that regard.
 

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Gotcha. That being said, I haven't autocrossed the car yet, but might when I get new tires just to have some real fun with it finally; but you think I would feel a difference with a one inch drop, and the right camber adjustment when I'm on a twisty road or when I'm taking a long curve if I'm being heavy on the throttle?
I definitely think you will be able to tell a difference. And I think you will like the difference too.
 

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I'm resurrecting this thread, since it's of interest to me this week in getting set up for a new autocross season.

As I mentioned before I finally got camber/caster plates in, and re-aligned as follows:

Front:
Camber -2.1*
Caster 7.9*
Toe 0

Rear:
Camber -1.1*
Toe 0.05*
total toe 0.10*

I know that with the Maximum Motorsports plates in, I should be able to go to -3* up front, but since it's my daily driver I didn't want to go too far to keep road manners under control and tire wear reasonable.
 
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Discussion Starter #28
After all the components I replaced on my last round of suspension upgrades I had an alignment done to bring it back to the specs I have been running since I first started changing things up:
Front:
Camber: -1.6
Caster: 7.0
Toe: 0.05
Total Toe: 0.10
Rear:
Camber -1.3
Toe 0.10
Total Toe 0.20

I found that these settings, while good with my old setup, didn't come close to taking advantage of the improved suspension. So I just had it realigned this past weekend to:
Front:
Camber: -2.0
Caster: 7.5
Toe: 0.02
Total Toe: 0.04
Rear:
Camber -1.7
Toe 0.05
Total Toe 0.10

Night and day! The car is so much better in the corners now, and is so planted it has to be experienced to be believed. @zhent it looks like your settings are fairly close to what I ended up going with.

I'm going to state again, I still believe in less negative camber in the rear than the front, with a difference of around 0.25 to 0.50. Obviously it doesn't matter as much if you are just a daily driver, but if you indulge in a lot of corner carving, then you might want to consider changing your specs a bit.

And for those that are wondering what suspension upgrades I have in place.
  • Eibach Sportline Springs
  • Ford Performance Track Struts/Shocks (These are next to be changed)
  • Steeda Rear Sub-Frame Bushings
  • BMR Cradle Lockout Kit
  • BMR Jacking Rails
  • Steeda Billet Rear Shock Mounts
  • Ford Performance Rear Toe/Knuckle Bearings
  • Steeda Rear Lower Control Arm Bearings
  • Steeda Rear Adjustable Toe Links
  • Steeda Rear Vertical Links
  • GT350R Rear Sway Bar
  • Pedders Front Swaybar 35mm
  • Steeda Front/Rear Adjustable Endlinks
  • Maximum Motorsport Front Caster/Camber Plates
  • Steeda Front Lower Lateral Links w/Extended Ball Joint
  • Steeda Front Lower Tension Links w/Bearings
  • Steeda Bumpsteer Kit
  • Carroll Shelby CS-3 Black Wheels Front: 20x9.5 +40 Rear: 20x11 +50
  • Firestone Firehawk Indy 500 Front: 255/35-20 Rear: 295/30-20
 

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@zhent @KewlWinter Both setups look good to me gentlemen (for your intended purposes). I do not disagree that if you intend on pushing your car in the corners, you should absolutely have more front camber (as you both do). For me, I need more highway stability, so I went with the Ford Performance factory specs (give or take). I like the feeling, but that's me. It doesn't wander, and it takes a smidge of effort for turn in (which is what I like). If I was tracking it every weekend, I would use your settings. In simpler words... quicker turn in with less straight line stabilty = more front camber. Less responsive turn in with more straight line stability = more rear camber. When I say "more", I am inferring an increase in negative camber.
 

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I was looking for rear camber setting and read this thread before I had my alignment done. Using the Ford workshop manual and ovaling the upper hole on the strut to steering knuckle mount my aligner got to -1.6 in front with about 5mm clearance of the tire from the strut. 2020 HPP-HP with the stock 265/40/19s with +40 offset. I seem to have the same clearance with the 275/35/19 BFGs on wheels with +41 offset. To run SCCA stock I have to use the ford manual adjustment. My alignment shop said they could not adjust the rear due to the camber adjustment arm bolt being put in so they could not get to the bolts. The car now has -1.3/-1.4 L/R rear camber. Has anyone else heard of this problem? I will probably leave the alignment alone until I run the car and get some tire temperatures. My understanding for the higher negative camber for the fronts is the macpherson strut type suspension will suffer camber gain under compression. I believe the reason we can run less negative in the rear is the rear suspension is multi-link and has better camber compensation under compression. Except the early 2000 mustang cobras, they had a really compromised geometry and had camber gain under compression. Camber gain or loss under compression has to do with the geometry of the upper and lower arms. Strut type suspension has camber gain (+) as the strut is compressed and shortens while the lower control arm arcs up and then in. I can hardly wait until the quarantine (SIP) ends and we get to play again.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
My alignment shop said they could not adjust the rear due to the camber adjustment arm bolt being put in so they could not get to the bolts. The car now has -1.3/-1.4 L/R rear camber. Has anyone else heard of this problem? I will probably leave the alignment alone until I run the car and get some tire temperatures.
Tell your alignment shop to calculate the delta between desired and actual camber degrees (both sides). Then put the rear up, remove the alignment heads, and remove the rear wheels. They can now reach the inboard upper camber arm bolt. Put a mechanical camber gauge on one of the rear wheel hubs, note the reading, then add the delta for that side to determine the desired reading. Loosen the bolt and and adjust the arm to that reading. Repeat for the other side. Put the wheels back on, put it back down, hang the alignment heads, and take new readings. Readjust the toe to bring it back to spec and because the toe adjustment will affect the camber. If the camber still needs tweaking, then repeat. If this sounds like more work than the alignment shop is willing to perform, you can get up in there to that bolt on an alignment rack from underneath if you raise the rear, but they still have to note the desired delta before raising, so they can apply it to the reading while its in the air. The biggest thing to remember is that a large camber adjustment is going to require a toe adjustment, which will in turn affect the camber adjustment, so they may have to "walk" the readings in with a couple of adjustment cycles. Not a problem with a routine maintenance alignment. Hope this helps.
 

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I was going to start a new thread with my question but figured better to keep it here.
I will be tying the rear sub frame down with some Steeda goodies and then off to the alignment shop.
Details are base suspension running 255/40 19 at all 4 corners. I'm looking for a starting point for alignment specs. I am in the same camp as Jake - looking for stability first - less concern for turn-in. Should I start with factory Performance Pack specs? I noticed quite a difference between that and base. Should I dial in more rear camber?
 

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I would start with factory PP specs and work from there.
 
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I finally went to two autocross days with the following specifications. I had access to a memory pyrometer to look at all four wheels after each run. The pyrometer uses a thermocouple that stabs the rubber so I can get a more averaged temperature than just a surface infrared pyrometer. I have -1.6 front with 0.05 toe in and -1.3/1.4 L/R in the rear with 0.12/.13 toe in. I started with high pressures and went down over two days and ten runs. Tires are 275-35-19 BFGs on 9.5 inch rims and a +41 mm offset.
6/20/2020​
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Surface was asphalt, I would go up 1-2 psi for concrete. Car felt pretty good at 33/31. My fastest times on Sunday required shifting to third 2X per run with 2X downshifting to 2nd. On Saturday I was not competitive but I lowered my delta to my buddy from 1.5 to 0.3 seconds by the end of Sunday. I I have always run more pressure in the front than rear for all of my cars in autocross (except the boxster, 40/60 front rear weight balance). With the HPP 3600 pounds of weight at about 57/43 F/R balance and the fronts doing more work at an autocross I will need the higher pressures. I am also running higher front pressures on the street for now 32/31 F/R. I am interested on what pressures other people are running as I saw a huge change in adhesion as the pressures dropped.
 

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I haven't been as scientific as you have with the temp readings, but I pretty much agree with your findings.

At autocross I run 34# front 32# rear in my Bridgestones. When I did a track driving class the instructors aired all four up to 35# but I never did get a chance to ask them why, especially as I had checked them and reset things before I went to the track. 35# cold becomes 42# hot pretty quickly.
 

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My buddy in an HPP/HP mustang is running 28 psi all around on RE-71Rs. I talked to a couple of the CAM-C guys and they were running 32/30 and 32/32 on BFGs. My experience is BFGs require more pressure than the 71s. As usual surface, suspension equipment and settings and driver preference will define what is best. Next Auto-x in two weeks (maybe).
 
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