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Hi All!

So I scheduled a GDI service for my 2016 Ecoboost convertible. The car has 42K mies on it. The technician i am taking it to is very reputale with Mustangs. He told me that this service would not only revent the engine from carbon and sludge buildup. However i just came across this article and now I am extremely concerend. Does anyone have any insight on this? Thank you.
 

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Hi All!

So I scheduled a GDI service for my 2016 Ecoboost convertible. The car has 42K mies on it. The technician i am taking it to is very reputale with Mustangs. He told me that this service would not only revent the engine from carbon and sludge buildup. However i just came across this article and now I am extremely concerend. Does anyone have any insight on this? Thank you.
Most of the engine cleaners and induction services can damage the turbo or engine. The issue with the cleaners is they can cause the turbo to overheat and blow out the seals. Any carbon chunks that break off during the cleaning process can also get sucked into the turbo and brake off the turbo fins on the compressor wheel. These EcoBoost engines can get carbon buildup but at 42k miles it's not going to be anything noticable. Running a catch can will frantically minimize the amount of buildup. Ford tech makuloco did a video explaining the EcoBoost platform and showed the valves on a 100k mile EcoBoost and it was practically clean with very little carbon buildup. My advice is stay away from induction services on the EcoBoost and your engine will be fine.
 

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I just got my UPR dual valve a couple of days ago. I've got to get it installed. My car has not quite 32K on it at the moment so I want to get that on soon.
 

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I just got my UPR dual valve a couple of days ago. I've got to get it installed. My car has not quite 32K on it at the moment so I want to get that on soon.
It's not too hard to install. One of the pcv connections is right under the intake manifold. You can remove it if you want easier access but if you have skinny arms like me you can remove the pcv line by feel.
 

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It's not too hard to install. One of the pcv connections is right under the intake manifold. You can remove it if you want easier access but if you have skinny arms like me you can remove the pcv line by feel.
Yeah, that's the issue I'm having. My arms aren't quite skinny enough apparently. 🤪

I think I'm going to have to get the front end up and get it from underneath. 😠
 

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Most of the engine cleaners and induction services can damage the turbo or engine. The issue with the cleaners is they can cause the turbo to overheat and blow out the seals. Any carbon chunks that break off during the cleaning process can also get sucked into the turbo and brake off the turbo fins on the compressor wheel.
I can't disagree more.

These cleaners are sprayed into the engine at a fast idle with no boost so there is no potential for overheating the turbo. It is not unusual for a turbo to glow red-hot after extended high boost running with no longer term negative effects. These cleaners soften and dissolve the carbon build up so there will not be anything going through the turbo that could damage it. Besides if you have carbon build up it could come loose at anytime and it passes through the engine and turbo harmlessly without you ever knowing.

The manufacturers aren't going to recommend these induction services until they have done all the testing to qualify them and they have no motivation to do so, it's a substantial cost with no payback for them.

I have been driving turbo cars as my daily drivers for the past 35 years while accumulating 3/4 of a million miles. Over that time I have never had a turbo or an internal engine failure and have used top end cleaners on a regular basis to clean out carbon build up.

There have been any number of videos showing the before and after results of using these cleaners. While they are not a magic bullet they do help just like having a catch can is not perfect but does help.

If anyone is planning on doing the top end cleaning themselves I would recommend the CRC product. CRC has been a provider of chemicals for the automotive industry since the late 60s and has been around since the early 1900s. They are as reputable of a company as you will find. As a matter they were so committed to the next generation of engineers and chemists they published a series of handbooks on math, chemistry and physics which they made available free of charge to college students in the science and engineering. Back in the early 70s when I was studying engineering the CRC math tables handbook was a life saver.

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I can't disagree more.

These cleaners are sprayed into the engine at a fast idle with no boost so there is no potential for overheating the turbo. It is not unusual for a turbo to glow red-hot after extended high boost running with no longer term negative effects. These cleaners soften and dissolve the carbon build up so there will not be anything going through the turbo that could damage it. Besides if you have carbon build up it could come loose at anytime and it passes through the engine and turbo harmlessly without you ever knowing.

The manufacturers aren't going to recommend these induction services until they have done all the testing to qualify them and they have no motivation to do so, it's a substantial cost with no payback for them.

I have been driving turbo cars as my daily drivers for the past 35 years while accumulating 3/4 of a million miles. Over that time I have never had a turbo or an internal engine failure and have used top end cleaners on a regular basis to clean out carbon build up.

There have been any number of videos showing the before and after results of using these cleaners. While they are not a magic bullet they do help just like having a catch can is not perfect but does help.

If anyone is planning on doing the top end cleaning themselves I would recommend the CRC product. CRC has been a provider of chemicals for the automotive industry since the late 60s and has been around since the early 1900s. They are as reputable of a company as you will find. As a matter they were so committed to the next generation of engineers and chemists they published a series of handbooks on math, chemistry and physics which they made available free of charge to college students in the science and engineering. Back in the early 70s when I was studying engineering the CRC math tables handbook was a life saver.

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I think you hit on something... "on a regular basis". My brother does the same thing as you do with his turbo Volvo and has never had any problems. I have almost 75,000 on my Ecoboost 2.0 Fusion and I'm always cleaning carbon off the chrome tips of the dual exhaust. Not sure what I am going to do. But all of you guys have got me thinking!
 

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I can't disagree more.

These cleaners are sprayed into the engine at a fast idle with no boost so there is no potential for overheating the turbo. It is not unusual for a turbo to glow red-hot after extended high boost running with no longer term negative effects. These cleaners soften and dissolve the carbon build up so there will not be anything going through the turbo that could damage it. Besides if you have carbon build up it could come loose at anytime and it passes through the engine and turbo harmlessly without you ever knowing.

The manufacturers aren't going to recommend these induction services until they have done all the testing to qualify them and they have no motivation to do so, it's a substantial cost with no payback for them.

I have been driving turbo cars as my daily drivers for the past 35 years while accumulating 3/4 of a million miles. Over that time I have never had a turbo or an internal engine failure and have used top end cleaners on a regular basis to clean out carbon build up.

There have been any number of videos showing the before and after results of using these cleaners. While they are not a magic bullet they do help just like having a catch can is not perfect but does help.

If anyone is planning on doing the top end cleaning themselves I would recommend the CRC product. CRC has been a provider of chemicals for the automotive industry since the late 60s and has been around since the early 1900s. They are as reputable of a company as you will find. As a matter they were so committed to the next generation of engineers and chemists they published a series of handbooks on math, chemistry and physics which they made available free of charge to college students in the science and engineering. Back in the early 70s when I was studying engineering the CRC math tables handbook was a life saver.

Sent from my motorola one 5G using Tapatalk
here is a question ,i'm using ford synth oil and i use nothing but premium fuel since new... the gas companys boast about top of the line cleaners in there premium fuel does this help at all in the oil buildup and also injector cleaning? ... another question about throttle body cleaning how often should it be cleaned and what product to use ? without damaging the ego or cat ? ... thanks for any info ...vp
 

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A lot of the top shelf synthetic oils have lower volitility so they tend evaporate less so there are less fumes in the crank case to be sucked up by the PCV system. The added detergents in Top Tier gas will help with keeping the injectors clean but since no fuel is being injected behind the intake valves it does nothing for preventing carbon build up on the back side of the valves.

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A lot of the top shelf synthetic oils have lower volitility so they tend evaporate less so there are less fumes in the crank case to be sucked up by the PCV system. The added detergents in Top Tier gas will help with keeping the injectors clean but since no fuel is being injected behind the intake valves it does nothing for preventing carbon build up on the back side of the valves.

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i was told by a engineer that the 2.3 injector sprays on the back of one of the valves to help keep it clean ? .. tks vp
 

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Yeah, that's the issue I'm having. My arms aren't quite skinny enough apparently. 🤪

I think I'm going to have to get the front end up and get it from underneath. 😠
I don't have skinny arms either, I struggled so much. I crawled on my back and i couldn't get my arm to bend around the starter to get leverage on that bottom connector. So to avoid me getting frustrated i just removed 8 bolts on the intake manifold and had an easy reach on the bottom QD. Other then that delay, it still took me less than an hour to install Mishimoto catch can.
 

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The link posted by ditsjets7 was written in Dec 2014. Note life changes :) .
Also the person in the 2 youtube videos near the end of the article has posted a recent video of how to manually clean your ecoboost intake valves. Not going to comment on the display of the screw driver. I have proper picks as he also notes too. Near the end of the new video he will mention the "BG" intake kit as maintenance. Now he does not give any warning of the possibility of damage. This now leads me to believe that using the correct chemicals and procedure will not create damage. Video can be found here
 
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