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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 18 PP with the BMR front of K Brace, the Steeda G-Trac K Brace, Steeda Jacking Rails and a tow hitch. At installing each if these mods the steering response has and chassis feel improved. Yet I would still like to feel a bit more from my steering wheel. I was watching a video where someone commented on the steering feel and they said that changing the bushings would vastly improve this. So my questions is, Which bushings and has anyone done this?
One of the mods I was also thinking if was getting a custom leather wrap where I would strip the OEM wrap and use a firmer cushion under the leather. I don't understand why they made this luxury car feeling steering wheel on a sporty car? I realize I might be on the minority on this. Also I got the Nitro NT555 and although the tires are grippy and they are more compliant than the Pirelli Zeros. The Pirellis were much more communicative. I realize some of the older Pirellis may not have been as grippy, but it looks like they addressed this with later models of the wheels. I almost prefer the less grip because I really am never driving at the limit. I believe I may have even driven faster on on and off ramps because of the communication from the tires.

Any advice would be much appreciated.
 

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I did the rear lower control arm bushings last year and will probably do the fronts this year. I'm running the steeda spherical bearing along with the Ford racing toe link spherical bearing. It made a huge difference in how "tight" the car feels, especially putting down power while turning. The only downside is it seems to follow the grooves in the road more. Steeda recently posted a video about this on youtube and suggested its caused by wider tires, I am running 275's. It's not anything major, just something I noticed. I will say, if you're doing this yourself, it is a pain in the butt. I was debating about getting the 12 ton or 20 ton press from harbor freight and ended up with the 20 ton. I'm not sure the 12 ton would have had the mustard to do the job. Full tilt boogie racing and bmr make a tool with threaded rod and steel tubes cut to make a press, similar to a ball joint press; but, it was no match for the bearings. Im from New England, it could just be the road salt that made it that much more difficult. I imagine that tool must have worked for someone if two companies make them; but, I needed all 20 tons of press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tabks
I did the rear lower control arm bushings last year and will probably do the fronts this year. I'm running the steeda spherical bearing along with the Ford racing toe link spherical bearing. It made a huge difference in how "tight" the car feels, especially putting down power while turning. The only downside is it seems to follow the grooves in the road more. Steeda recently posted a video about this on youtube and suggested its caused by wider tires, I am running 275's. It's not anything major, just something I noticed. I will say, if you're doing this yourself, it is a pain in the butt. I was debating about getting the 12 ton or 20 ton press from harbor freight and ended up with the 20 ton. I'm not sure the 12 ton would have had the mustard to do the job. Full tilt boogie racing and bmr make a tool with threaded rod and steel tubes cut to make a press, similar to a ball joint press; but, it was no match for the bearings. Im from New England, it could just be the road salt that made it that much more difficult. I imagine that tool must have worked for someone if two companies make them; but, I needed all 20 tons of press.
Thanks for your help and advice! Seems like a nice setup you have there. I'm on Long Island. Don't get as much snow and salt as New England, but we get a fair share.
 
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Hello
I have a 2019 PP, I recently replaced my rear suspension with:
Steeda differential bushings
Steeda vertical link
Steeda toe link
Steeda camber arms
Steeda cradle alignment kit
Steeda cradle support system
Steeda Non adjustable pro action shocks
Front suspension:
Steeda Non adjustable pro action struts
Steeda G- track front K- brace
Steeda Strut Camber plates

You got it right when you said luxury car feel, I think Ford did this because now Ford offers two cars only the Mustang and the Fusion everything else is a crossover, suv, or truck. So customers who want a coupe get the Mustang so for the majority of customers you make a luxury sport coupe (a small thunderbird)

I didn’t necessarily need all the adjustability because I’m not going to track the car all that much but I wanted tight, crisp and controlled handling out of my Mustang so the motivation for me for all the suspension changes was the better bushings those suspension parts give you. I know you can do the spherical bushings on the knuckle and lower control arm, but that seems to me that would be for all out track performance. The down side is you start crossing the line of livable street manners and a really harsh ride for a car that’s going to spend the majority of its time on the street (but to each their own)

Up front I have the Steeda K- brace. I just put on Steeda struts/shocks this past weekend. Steeda Non- adjustable Pro Action. I used my factory PP springs because I really didn’t want to lower my car and I’m using my factory sway bars up front the sway bar is around 32mm the rear is around 25mm I don’t know if that’s just for PP cars but they work good along with my factory springs, plus through all of this it was an experiment to see what was the reason(s) for such a poor handling car, with a sports car nameplate.

My conclusion is most of the components on the rear cradle are junk if your looking for a car with overall good ballance and handling. The dampers are useless. If you like your soft ride Mustang enjoy it as I said (to each their own) Theirs people out there that like the soft suspension on their Corvettes. Yes Chevy does offer a soft suspension it’s typically known as the base suspension.

Like I said my factory sway bars and springs work really good with my other suspension mods, but they are the PP sway bars and springs. The car handles great firm, controlled, no drifting and no more seemingly constant corrections while cornering.

Last suspension mod will be Ford front control arms. I think because I have the PP I just need the front control arm with factory spherical bearing and brake air deflector. I believe the PP has the rear spherical bearing. For got to check while doing the struts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello
I have a 2019 PP, I recently replaced my rear suspension with:
Steeda differential bushings
Steeda vertical link
Steeda toe link
Steeda camber arms
Steeda cradle alignment kit
Steeda cradle support system
Steeda Non adjustable pro action shocks
Front suspension:
Steeda Non adjustable pro action struts
Steeda G- track front K- brace
Steeda Strut Camber plates

You got it right when you said luxury car feel, I think Ford did this because now Ford offers two cars only the Mustang and the Fusion everything else is a crossover, suv, or truck. So customers who want a coupe get the Mustang so for the majority of customers you make a luxury sport coupe (a small thunderbird)

I didn’t necessarily need all the adjustability because I’m not going to track the car all that much but I wanted tight, crisp and controlled handling out of my Mustang so the motivation for me for all the suspension changes was the better bushings those suspension parts give you. I know you can do the spherical bushings on the knuckle and lower control arm, but that seems to me that would be for all out track performance. The down side is you start crossing the line of livable street manners and a really harsh ride for a car that’s going to spend the majority of its time on the street (but to each their own)

Up front I have the Steeda K- brace. I just put on Steeda struts/shocks this past weekend. Steeda Non- adjustable Pro Action. I used my factory PP springs because I really didn’t want to lower my car and I’m using my factory sway bars up front the sway bar is around 32mm the rear is around 25mm I don’t know if that’s just for PP cars but they work good along with my factory springs, plus through all of this it was an experiment to see what was the reason(s) for such a poor handling car, with a sports car nameplate.

My conclusion is most of the components on the rear cradle are junk if your looking for a car with overall good ballance and handling. The dampers are useless. If you like your soft ride Mustang enjoy it as I said (to each their own) Theirs people out there that like the soft suspension on their Corvettes. Yes Chevy does offer a soft suspension it’s typically known as the base suspension.

Like I said my factory sway bars and springs work really good with my other suspension mods, but they are the PP sway bars and springs. The car handles great firm, controlled, no drifting and no more seemingly constant corrections while cornering.

Last suspension mod will be Ford front control arms. I think because I have the PP I just need the front control arm with factory spherical bearing and brake air deflector. I believe the PP has the rear spherical bearing. For got to check while doing the struts.
Wow. That's a great build. I don't plan on tracking my car either, just want a fun to drive car that makes me more connected. Thanks for your advice.

What is your overall take on the Steeda shocks?

I am starting to get a little more sway. I was considering changing the mounts for the sway bars, but would like the Steeda adjustable bars.

Right now in the crossroads of buying another ecoboost and making those changes on my new car. I have a new job that is 1/3 my last commute so thinking to get a new car and ride that until the wheels pop off or if I'm ready for something new.
 

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You're asking about steering feel, but everyone is talking about rear suspension parts....what am I missing? lol

Changing suspension parts can make the car feel more connected and rigid, but the main culprit behind the lackluster steering feel is the electric steering rack. Unless you want to swap out your steering rack for a manual or traditional hydraulic rack, you're not going to change the steering feel. You can throw on all the suspension upgrades you want and have a car that carves very well, but it's still going to have a numb steering feel.

If you're trying to tighten up the chassis and make it more responsive, it doesn't look like you have a rear cradle lockout yet? I'd recommend that first. Just the basic/cheaper BMR lockout kit is a good improvement in that department. With just a few minor mods, my car is plenty rigid and responsive. Be careful with trying to make the chassis more rigid/stiff with brace after brace unless you're not using the car on the streets. The stiffer it becomes, the less fun it is to drive on the streets and will actually perform worse than a car that has some compliance and ability to take a road imperfection in the middle of a high speed turn without losing traction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You're asking about steering feel, but everyone is talking about rear suspension parts....what am I missing? lol

Changing suspension parts can make the car feel more connected and rigid, but the main culprit behind the lackluster steering feel is the electric steering rack. Unless you want to swap out your steering rack for a manual or traditional hydraulic rack, you're not going to change the steering feel. You can throw on all the suspension upgrades you want and have a car that carves very well, but it's still going to have a numb steering feel.

If you're trying to tighten up the chassis and make it more responsive, it doesn't look like you have a rear cradle lockout yet? I'd recommend that first. Just the basic/cheaper BMR lockout kit is a good improvement in that department. With just a few minor mods, my car is plenty rigid and responsive. Be careful with trying to make the chassis more rigid/stiff with brace after brace unless you're not using the car on the streets. The stiffer it becomes, the less fun it is to drive on the streets and will actually perform worse than a car that has some compliance and ability to take a road imperfection in the middle of a high speed turn without losing traction.
I hear you. Changing the steering rack is definitely not in my future. I guess I will play a little more with the suspension, but will just have to live with some of the limitations. After all I've been doing that for almost 3 years now.

Thanks for your advice.
 
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This is where it gets tricky, people sometimes buy more than what they need for street use or very limited track use.
You mentioned the Steeda adjustable sway bars, that whole Steeda sway bar package is almost 1K. So the question becomes on the street are you ever going to come close of getting the benefit and or full potential of a 1K sway bar package even if it is adjusted to the lowest setting for the street. What I'm getting at here is like I mentioned my PP sway bar up front is around 32mm rear sway bar around 25mm and these are factory sway bars.Thats is a really good sway bar set for the street and would do dam good on the track as well. Also you start putting huge sway bars on a street car you start going into the harsh ride spectrum. Also using the steeda sway bars with factory springs depending on the spring rates you could start to have other issues, you might not notice it on the street but pushing the car hard on the track theirs a good chance the suspension components would not work cohesively I guess is good way to put it.

So you could save yourself a whole lot of money by checking ebey or call some used car part bone yards and see if you can get a set of PP sway bars.

The reason I bought all the control arms was like I said mostly for the bushing up grades to get the deflection/squishy feeling out of the suspension if their was a bushing kit for the factory camber arm and vertical link I would have went that route, their is no bushing kits.(I couldn't find any) After getting the squishy feeling out of the suspension, that allowed me to start focusing in on the struts/shocks and springs. At that point I felt the springs weren't that bad for how I wanted my car set up. Turning my attention to the struts/shocks I knew they were junk, the big tip off is obviously how they don't simply perform but the fact that Ford offers shock/struct up grades with handling packages. Sadly even with the PP package on my 2019 it still sucks, its just a bastardized package that looks to me like Ford picked through existing parts bins to offer something. The best upgrade is the brakes as too you can say its actually beneficial to the cause and the sway bars.

The reason I went with the Steeda non-adjustable pro-action was on Steeda's web page they have a chart that shows Steeda's recommendations. Since I was using my factory springs that was the recommendation according to the chart.
Yes Steeda is correct in their recommendation it says good for the street and good for the track as well. In my opinion
the way these struts/shocks are valved/tuned is what strut/shock should be on the eco boost PP FROM THE FACTORY.
I would gladly forego the dash gages, rear spoiler, aluminum spun dash and hell even the shock tower brace for a good set of struts/shocks.These struts/shocks really settle and control the suspension even over a very bumpy road the tires stay well planted, I never felt the bumps were getting ahead of the struts/shocks. They are more firm and you feel the bumps more, but its controlled and not jarring. Again on my PP it says it has heavy duty springs on the front, what that exactly means from Ford I don't know but it wouldn't surprise me if they were GT springs. I don't know what the spring rates are front or back or how much they differ from a base eco boost.

So the way I wanted my car set up was defiantly more for the street than the track. the drawback is like I said you have to buy complete suspension arms to get the benefit of the bushings which is the only way your going to get a tight suspension. I know there are people who put lowering springs on their car and start raving about the handling, well yes it is true the car is handling better, but its really masking a soft crappy suspension as far as the control arms are concerned and they can only mask the weak suspension arms to a point.

My suggestion is start with the rear cradle alignment kit and rear cradle support kit. these two things will get your rear cradle aligned with the rest of the car properly and get some of the squishy flex out of rear suspension, plus they are not that expensive. You can get the Ford spherical bearing rear toe arm fairly inexpensive upgrade. The rear camber arm upgrade isn't a must do unless you go with lowering springs, but the rear vertical link is, your choice delrin bushing or poly bushing poly bushings are cheaper. Struts/shocks a must do factory base struts/shocks are horrible. Talked about sway bars already. If your looking to do a fun street car with once in a great while track day and you don't want a stage coach stiff ride on the street this is what I found taking apart and redoing my suspension all the work I did myself so any more questions feel free to ask.
 

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You're asking about steering feel, but everyone is talking about rear suspension parts....what am I missing? lol

Changing suspension parts can make the car feel more connected and rigid, but the main culprit behind the lackluster steering feel is the electric steering rack. Unless you want to swap out your steering rack for a manual or traditional hydraulic rack, you're not going to change the steering feel. You can throw on all the suspension upgrades you want and have a car that carves very well, but it's still going to have a numb steering feel.

If you're trying to tighten up the chassis and make it more responsive, it doesn't look like you have a rear cradle lockout yet? I'd recommend that first. Just the basic/cheaper BMR lockout kit is a good improvement in that department. With just a few minor mods, my car is plenty rigid and responsive. Be careful with trying to make the chassis more rigid/stiff with brace after brace unless you're not using the car on the streets. The stiffer it becomes, the less fun it is to drive on the streets and will actually perform worse than a car that has some compliance and ability to take a road imperfection in the middle of a high speed turn without losing traction.
The Ford electric steering rack is something, exactly what that something is,is the question no matter what mode I select it feels the same. I agree making a car too stiff for the street is not fun. Thats why I didn't do the spherical metal bearings on the knuckle or rear lower arm control. Another concern I had was pressing out the bushings on an aluminum control arm or knuckle even though the kit comes with a help tool to press out the bearing and press in the new one. When I had my Corvette chevy recommended not pressing out the ball joint and pressing in a new ball joint because of how easy it is to stress aluminum if you didn't press the ball joint in or out correctly chevy felt it was too risky because you wouldn't realize it if you did overstress the aluminum.
 

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Lol funny you mention that, I literally just got done rebuilding the entire suspension on my 2001 Corvette a few weeks ago, including all 8 ball joints. Plenty of people have done it with zero issues. I actually pressed the front lowers in by hand with a wrench lol, but finished the rest with a 20 ton press and large vice. I do agree that it's important to pay special attention to how they are going in and out. I think some Corvette guys are just a little paranoid. The guy that helped me press them in is a technical director for one of the nation's largest CV axle manufacturers and he had no qualms working with aluminum control arms haha.

I do have lower toe bushings waiting to go in my Mustang and have no qualms doing it, it's just not high priority and I keep forgetting they're there lol. Heating up the aluminum and freezing the bushings overnight should help them go in easier, but if Ford sells them separately with instructions, I'd bet they won't be that difficult to install.

I really think the electric rack in my Mustang is a key contributor to my somewhat lackluster experience with this car. It handles surprisingly well and it feels fairly nimble, but there's just a day to day driving "numbness" to the steering. With my tires and alignment, I get an undesirable amount of tramlining and I honestly don't feel comfortable with the steering unless it's in sport mode. Normal and comfort just seem to leave too much play in it so I feel like I'm correcting too late and it's just too squirrelly to be comfortable.
 

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Lol funny you mention that, I literally just got done rebuilding the entire suspension on my 2001 Corvette a few weeks ago, including all 8 ball joints. Plenty of people have done it with zero issues. I actually pressed the front lowers in by hand with a wrench lol, but finished the rest with a 20 ton press and large vice. I do agree that it's important to pay special attention to how they are going in and out. I think some Corvette guys are just a little paranoid. The guy that helped me press them in is a technical director for one of the nation's largest CV axle manufacturers and he had no qualms working with aluminum control arms haha.

I do have lower toe bushings waiting to go in my Mustang and have no qualms doing it, it's just not high priority and I keep forgetting they're there lol. Heating up the aluminum and freezing the bushings overnight should help them go in easier, but if Ford sells them separately with instructions, I'd bet they won't be that difficult to install.

I really think the electric rack in my Mustang is a key contributor to my somewhat lackluster experience with this car. It handles surprisingly well and it feels fairly nimble, but there's just a day to day driving "numbness" to the steering. With my tires and alignment, I get an undesirable amount of tramlining and I honestly don't feel comfortable with the steering unless it's in sport mode. Normal and comfort just seem to leave too much play in it so I feel like I'm correcting too late and it's just too squirrelly to be comfortable.
Funny you should mention the online feel of the steering, until I did all the suspension work I was always having to make constant corrections even while cornering. What it is, is a cumulative effect with the S550 platform. Way to soft bushings, soft dampers, a half ass rear cradle mounting and location system from the factory and a crappy electric steering unit. All add up to a big pile of stackable tolerance steering numbness. I can say now the car is a lot better and I can push the car with a reasonable amount of confidence, before honestly I was never comfortable with the car until now after really redoing most of the suspension.

Be careful heating up aluminum it has a much, much lower heat resistance to temperature than regular steel. Stay safe is all I’m saying.

Speaking of Corvettes C5 and C6 have really come down in price which almost make it attractive to get another one but then I’m reminded of the hidden corvette mod tax. So haha
 

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@LostSAAB What steering setting are you using? Just curious. I put mine in sport mode right after I bought it 3 years ago and haven't changed it since. The normal and comfort or whatever modes are just too loose feeling for me.
 
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@LostSAAB What steering setting are you using? Just curious. I put mine in sport mode right after I bought it 3 years ago and haven't changed it since. The normal and comfort or whatever modes are just too loose feeling for me.
I keep it in normal mode because the sport mode
for me, has too much of a heavy feel. I am curious to know what the steering ratio are between each mode or is the difference the amount of effort needed to turn the steering wheel. Because I really can’t tell much of a difference.

I’m going to try a simple test I thought of just now when I get home (I’m at work now) I’m going to put a mark on my steering wheel put the window down stand next to the car and turn the steering wheel in the 3 modes and while I’m standing outside the car turning the steering wheel I’ll see how much the front tires move in relation to the position of the steering wheel between the 3 modes.

Maybe you can try this as well so we can compare are results or will this experiment show anything. Maybe someone already tried this I didn’t search the forum to see.

Thinking about this right now I haven’t tried changing the steering modes sense I did all the suspension work so I’ll try driving in the different modes so I can see if theirs more of a difference in the handling of the car.
 

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I keep it in normal mode because the sport mode
for me, has too much of a heavy feel. I am curious to know what the steering ratio are between each mode or is the difference the amount of effort needed to turn the steering wheel. Because I really can’t tell much of a difference.

I’m going to try a simple test I thought of just now when I get home (I’m at work now) I’m going to put a mark on my steering wheel put the window down stand next to the car and turn the steering wheel in the 3 modes and while I’m standing outside the car turning the steering wheel I’ll see how much the front tires move in relation to the position of the steering wheel between the 3 modes.

Maybe you can try this as well so we can compare are results or will this experiment show anything. Maybe someone already tried this I didn’t search the forum to see.

Thinking about this right now I haven’t tried changing the steering modes sense I did all the suspension work so I’ll try driving in the different modes so I can see if theirs more of a difference in the handling of the car.
I will agree at times it does feel heavy in sport. I can feel it in my arms sometimes after a long drive. I tried comfort once on the highway hoping it would help and I felt like I was all over the place haha. I don't know either if it changes steering ratio or just feel, it would be interesting to find out though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is where it gets tricky, people sometimes buy more than what they need for street use or very limited track use.
You mentioned the Steeda adjustable sway bars, that whole Steeda sway bar package is almost 1K. So the question becomes on the street are you ever going to come close of getting the benefit and or full potential of a 1K sway bar package even if it is adjusted to the lowest setting for the street. What I'm getting at here is like I mentioned my PP sway bar up front is around 32mm rear sway bar around 25mm and these are factory sway bars.Thats is a really good sway bar set for the street and would do dam good on the track as well. Also you start putting huge sway bars on a street car you start going into the harsh ride spectrum. Also using the steeda sway bars with factory springs depending on the spring rates you could start to have other issues, you might not notice it on the street but pushing the car hard on the track theirs a good chance the suspension components would not work cohesively I guess is good way to put it.

So you could save yourself a whole lot of money by checking ebey or call some used car part bone yards and see if you can get a set of PP sway bars.

The reason I bought all the control arms was like I said mostly for the bushing up grades to get the deflection/squishy feeling out of the suspension if their was a bushing kit for the factory camber arm and vertical link I would have went that route, their is no bushing kits.(I couldn't find any) After getting the squishy feeling out of the suspension, that allowed me to start focusing in on the struts/shocks and springs. At that point I felt the springs weren't that bad for how I wanted my car set up. Turning my attention to the struts/shocks I knew they were junk, the big tip off is obviously how they don't simply perform but the fact that Ford offers shock/struct up grades with handling packages. Sadly even with the PP package on my 2019 it still sucks, its just a bastardized package that looks to me like Ford picked through existing parts bins to offer something. The best upgrade is the brakes as too you can say its actually beneficial to the cause and the sway bars.

The reason I went with the Steeda non-adjustable pro-action was on Steeda's web page they have a chart that shows Steeda's recommendations. Since I was using my factory springs that was the recommendation according to the chart.
Yes Steeda is correct in their recommendation it says good for the street and good for the track as well. In my opinion
the way these struts/shocks are valved/tuned is what strut/shock should be on the eco boost PP FROM THE FACTORY.
I would gladly forego the dash gages, rear spoiler, aluminum spun dash and hell even the shock tower brace for a good set of struts/shocks.These struts/shocks really settle and control the suspension even over a very bumpy road the tires stay well planted, I never felt the bumps were getting ahead of the struts/shocks. They are more firm and you feel the bumps more, but its controlled and not jarring. Again on my PP it says it has heavy duty springs on the front, what that exactly means from Ford I don't know but it wouldn't surprise me if they were GT springs. I don't know what the spring rates are front or back or how much they differ from a base eco boost.

So the way I wanted my car set up was defiantly more for the street than the track. the drawback is like I said you have to buy complete suspension arms to get the benefit of the bushings which is the only way your going to get a tight suspension. I know there are people who put lowering springs on their car and start raving about the handling, well yes it is true the car is handling better, but its really masking a soft crappy suspension as far as the control arms are concerned and they can only mask the weak suspension arms to a point.

My suggestion is start with the rear cradle alignment kit and rear cradle support kit. these two things will get your rear cradle aligned with the rest of the car properly and get some of the squishy flex out of rear suspension, plus they are not that expensive. You can get the Ford spherical bearing rear toe arm fairly inexpensive upgrade. The rear camber arm upgrade isn't a must do unless you go with lowering springs, but the rear vertical link is, your choice delrin bushing or poly bushing poly bushings are cheaper. Struts/shocks a must do factory base struts/shocks are horrible. Talked about sway bars already. If your looking to do a fun street car with once in a great while track day and you don't want a stage coach stiff ride on the street this is what I found taking apart and redoing my suspension all the work I did myself so any more questions feel free to ask.
Once again, thanks so much for taking your time to give me such detailed info. I have a performance pack so little by little I will begin to chip away on some of your recommendations. I want a great street car that as you said can have a little fun if ever on a track. Thanks for the info on the Steeda shocks. I already swapped out the rear vertical links. I was going to go with Steeda but Boomba Racing had theirs on a sale I just couldn't pass up. Besides you can choose a cool color that only you can see when you install them or swap tires. Out of curiosity, what is your tire set up?
@LostSAAB What steering setting are you using? Just curious. I put mine in sport mode right after I bought it 3 years ago and haven't changed it since. The normal and comfort or whatever modes are just too loose feeling for me.
I have it on the sport setting. I like the extra weight but there is this touch of numbness especially on center. It gives better feedback when on turns, but I don't have too many fun safe twisty roads, that I can always ride on. Don't get me wrong I enjoy the car and even more with my few mods. Just want it to communicate a little more. Which is part of my point of making the steering wheel less cushy. I think the padding dampens some of the info the car is transmitting. Maybe since it's a 4 cylinder dampening the engine may not be a bad thing. Oh well, part of the fun of this car is trying some new things.
 

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I like the extra weight but there is this touch of numbness especially on center. It gives better feedback when on turns
I can agree with that. Since I lowered mine an inch, I get a touch of bump steer which is annoying too, but manageable. The large tires I have also seem to tramline once in a while. I tolerate it all because it does handle well. I chalk it all up to nature of the beast I guess.
 

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Once again, thanks so much for taking your time to give me such detailed info. I have a performance pack so little by little I will begin to chip away on some of your recommendations. I want a great street car that as you said can have a little fun if ever on a track. Thanks for the info on the Steeda shocks. I already swapped out the rear vertical links. I was going to go with Steeda but Boomba Racing had theirs on a sale I just couldn't pass up. Besides you can choose a cool color that only you can see when you install them or swap tires. Out of curiosity, what is your tire set up?

I have it on the sport setting. I like the extra weight but there is this touch of numbness especially on center. It gives better feedback when on turns, but I don't have too many fun safe twisty roads, that I can always ride on. Don't get me wrong I enjoy the car and even more with my few mods. Just want it to communicate a little more. Which is part of my point of making the steering wheel less cushy. I think the padding dampens some of the info the car is transmitting. Maybe since it's a 4 cylinder dampening the engine may not be a bad thing. Oh well, part of the fun of this car is trying some new things.
I Still have my P-zero original tires and factory black rims. I will definitely need new tires by the end of summer and I'm not putting P-zero's back on. Where I live I get all 4 seasons and rainy days so I'm going with a performance all season. I've always had good luck with Good-Year all season performance tires. At this point I don't really know what brand of tire. I'll keep my factory rims because I think they look good but they are on the heavy side so you can't say they are a true performance rim. Again tracking the car isn't my priority, however I do feel where my car is now it will certainly do fairly well on the track for a primary street light duty track car.

When I started my suspension work I didn't plan on all this but Steeda had everything in stock when I wanted it. On American Muscle their is a company JR Performance if I remember correctly they have adjustable arms with upgraded bushing that are less expensive than Steeda as an option. Steeda gets a lot of prestige because they have been around sense almost the beginning of the Fox body Mustangs and fair is fair they do make good products, but as Mr. Spock says captain there are always alternatives.
 
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