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stock tune, no mods, and only run 93.

Though I didn't do that and haven't boomed (yet).
 
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From the reported ecobooms on the forums it mostly occurs on ECU tuned cars and rarely on bone stock cars.

The more aggressive tunes appear to have a higher failure rate but that is only my opinion based on what I have read over the years. Also, many ecobooms have been further modified beyond just a tune which may contribute to the failures.

I would recommend an oil separator with a tune as the blow-by can be excessive in some engines and dilute octane. Many ecobooms had oil separators so an oil separator will not prevent an ecoboom but it will keep contamination to a minimum. Low octane with an agressive tune can have catastrophic consequences like detonation, pre ignition and the like.

In my configuration, when I flash the ECU I collect twice the amount of engine sludge vs. stock tune. This means I have more octane dilution when I have a higher minimal octane requirement.
 

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No, I didn't get that. I've heard some of the burble tunes, and they're just not for me.
 

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I recently experienced Ecoboom on my 2015 Eco at 83,000 miles. I had an E30 tune with just an intercooler upgrade for about 15,000 miles. But I was experiencing idle issues, misfires on start, and unusually high knock before this occurred. We believe it’s a spun rod, and I have a video issue in my thread on this board. I’m replacing the engine with a 2019 w/ 25,000 miles on it.
 

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I recently experienced Ecoboom on my 2015 Eco at 83,000 miles. I had an E30 tune with just an intercooler upgrade for about 15,000 miles. But I was experiencing idle issues, misfires on start, and unusually high knock before this occurred. We believe it’s a spun rod, and I have a video issue in my thread on this board. I’m replacing the engine with a 2019 w/ 25,000 miles on it.
EDIT: So a spun rod can be caused by a minor Ecoboom as you stated, or low oil pressure. Has anyone determined the root cause as it could be either a detonation or low oil pressure? from a list I found on the web #9 shows detonation and high boost as possible causes.


Contributing factors that can cause oil pressure and lubrication problems in an engine include:
  1. Low oil level in the oil pan due to leaks, maintenance neglect or improper filling.
  2. Oil pump cavitation and aeration at high RPM due to pump design, restrictions in the pump inlet tube or pickup, or oil sloshing away from the pickup in the bottom of the pan due to extreme cornering, acceleration or braking forces.
  3. Blocked or partially blocked oil gallery or oil filter.
  4. Bearings installed incorrectly (oil holes do not line up with the gallery holes). This is especially important with cam bearings that can be easily misaligned.
  5. Bearing clearances too tight for the oil viscosity being used. Late-model engines such as a Chevy LS or Ford modular V8 with tighter main and rod bearing clearances of .0015˝ to .002˝ usually require a thin multi-viscosity motor oil such as 5W-20. Fill the crankcase with a relatively thick racing oil and you’ll have problems right from the start. Tighter bearing clearances require thinner oils while looser bearing clearances of .003˝ to .004˝ in “old school” motors and race motors require thicker oils (20W-50 or 50W) to maintain the protective oil film between the bearings and their journals.
  6. Misalignment of the bearing shell and crank journal.
  7. Mistakes made when machining housing bores or crank journals (wrong diameters).
  8. Cold starts, especially in close tolerance racing engines running thicker oils.
  9. Extremely high bearing-to-crank loads due to lugging, detonation or high boost or nitrous applications.
 

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Extremely high bearing-to-crank loads due to lugging, detonation or high boost or nitrous applications.
No data to back this and while i haven't had a boom I think lugging could be a major factor. Its easy to do without recognizing it especially at low speeds and/or pulling a hill. I have watched while in 6th gear doing 70mph hit a hill so i give it slightly more throttle notice my knock go negative between -1to -2
To almost instantly go positive to about 2.5 and get some ignition corrections. It seems to me the ecu is calling for more power in a lug then immediately gets knock and starts to pull power. Everytime you let off and apply throttle again it will repeat. I normally drive in 5th unless im 70mph+ and even then when pulling hills i will drop to 5th. And tbh i haven't seen a negative impact on MPG i adverage around 24-25 50/50 highway and city and rarely see knock or ignition corrections this way. The ecu is doing its job but repeatedly i can see this causing accumulated stress and all the more so the more aggressive of a tune.

Again no data just a thought and probably way off.
 

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No data to back this and while i haven't had a boom I think lugging could be a major factor. Its easy to do without recognizing it especially at low speeds and/or pulling a hill. I have watched while in 6th gear doing 70mph hit a hill so i give it slightly more throttle notice my knock go negative between -1to -2
To almost instantly go positive to about 2.5 and get some ignition corrections. It seems to me the ecu is calling for more power in a lug then immediately gets knock and starts to pull power. Everytime you let off and apply throttle again it will repeat. I normally drive in 5th unless im 70mph+ and even then when pulling hills i will drop to 5th. And tbh i haven't seen a negative impact on MPG i adverage around 24-25 50/50 highway and city and rarely see knock or ignition corrections this way. The ecu is doing its job but repeatedly i can see this causing accumulated stress and all the more so the more aggressive of a tune.

Again no data just a thought and probably way off.
I don't think you are way off at all. I shift in a similar manner to you. It seems you can almost feel the motor being unhappy when it starts to lug. I have the 10 speed auto in my new ranger and it lugs terribly. I understand why they don't want higher rpms (mpg's), but in my opinion they need to run a couple hundred rpm's in every gear. I can come into town easing off the throttle down to 35mph and it will still be in 7th gear. Unacceptable to me. If they offered a manual ranger, I would have got it in a minute. I'm not knocking anyone with an auto mustang, I just personally hate when my vehicles shift for me ha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No data to back this and while i haven't had a boom I think lugging could be a major factor. Its easy to do without recognizing it especially at low speeds and/or pulling a hill. I have watched while in 6th gear doing 70mph hit a hill so i give it slightly more throttle notice my knock go negative between -1to -2
To almost instantly go positive to about 2.5 and get some ignition corrections. It seems to me the ecu is calling for more power in a lug then immediately gets knock and starts to pull power. Everytime you let off and apply throttle again it will repeat. I normally drive in 5th unless im 70mph+ and even then when pulling hills i will drop to 5th. And tbh i haven't seen a negative impact on MPG i adverage around 24-25 50/50 highway and city and rarely see knock or ignition corrections this way. The ecu is doing its job but repeatedly i can see this causing accumulated stress and all the more so the more aggressive of a tune.

Again no data just a thought and probably way off.
So your theory is that boom happens when you are at low RPM range and demand power?
 

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I don't think you are way off at all. I shift in a similar manner to you. It seems you can almost feel the motor being unhappy when it starts to lug. I have the 10 speed auto in my new ranger and it lugs terribly. I understand why they don't want higher rpms (mpg's), but in my opinion they need to run a couple hundred rpm's in every gear. I can come into town easing off the throttle down to 35mph and it will still be in 7th gear. Unacceptable to me. If they offered a manual ranger, I would have got it in a minute. I'm not knocking anyone with an auto mustang, I just personally hate when my vehicles shift for me ha.
I can see the 10 speed having a tougher time figuring out what proper gear to be in, but I'm not so sure its as big a problem with the 6 speed auto, in particular when I'm in 'Sport'. The ECU seems to purposefully keep the RPM's pretty high.
 

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So your theory is that boom happens when you are at low RPM range and demand power?
Not every case. But i think it could vary well be a likely factor contributing to the boom as it definitely raises knock/predetonation virtually every time you lug and one would assume the more aggressive the tune the more aggressive this happens. Again just a theory.
 

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I can see the 10 speed having a tougher time figuring out what proper gear to be in, but I'm not so sure its as big a problem with the 6 speed auto, in particular when I'm in 'Sport'. The ECU seems to purposefully keep the RPM's pretty high.
Agreed. I had a 6 speed auto in my f150 prior to the mustang and I thought it was the perfect amount. These 10 speeds are too much in my opinion. When I'm on the 2 lane here with my ranger (55 mph), I usually end up locking out 10th gear and sometimes 9th depending on traffic, so it doesn't shift so high. There's just no need for it to be in 10th at 50-55, pulling 11-1200 rpms.
 

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I've been warned about "engine lugging" from other Ecoboost owners. And also have heard about weak connecting rods being an issue, plus a few concerns about the open deck block on the 2.3 motor.
I've also been recently advised to add an oil catch can along with a 100 psi check valve.
Has there been any internal improvements (made by Ford) between the 2015 motors and the 2020 motors??
 

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2020 Ecoboost with HPP. Switched out summer tires for all season, with 275/40/19 on back.
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So, for people that leave their cars stock and do not thrash them....do these engines still fail?
 

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So, for people that leave their cars stock and do not thrash them....do these engines still fail?
While anything can happen, I believe you're okay if you do proper maintenance, let the turbo / engine properly warm up before pushing it, and not lugging the motor.
 
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