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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Nothing can be more irritating after you've spent a lot of time carefully washing your car, only to be left with some unsightly water spotting after you've rinsed and dried your car.

I normally blow dry my car after washing it with my MetroVac Blaster blower that produces filtered warm air at an airspeed of 28,000FPM.

Using an air blower is better than using drying towels or chamois cloths, as the less you touch your paintwork the better as it lessens the chances of introducing fine scratches.

It also has the benefit of getting water out of joints, channels, grilles, wheels and areas you cannot use a drying towel.

As I am relying on water evaporation using this method, there is more chance of water spotting due to minerals, calcium and other impurities to leave spots on the paintwork.

To alleviate this problem, I decided to hook up a commercial grade water filter I can attach inline to the water supply of my pressure washer when I want to do a final rinse before the drying stage.

Because the filter is designed to use water plumbing fittings, I had to make up lengths of reinforced hose with barb reducers to fit standard 12mm garden hose and fittings that would attach to the pressure washer and tap hose connections.

So I can have it ready for use in my driveway, I used an old bathroom shower caddy as a bracket that I could hang from a wall mount....



When ready to do the final rinse, I simply disconnect the water supply hose that normally attaches direct to the pressure washer water inlet and attach it to the filter inlet.



The filter head has a variable water by-pass which you set depending on the hardness of the water in your area.
Many water suppliers publishes the Calcium hardness of the water in your area on their website.
Where my water comes from the Calcium carbonate hardness, which is tested twice per week, is rated at around 30 mg/Litre, so I can use a by-pass filtration setting of 70%.

This prolongs the life of the filter medium before it needs replacing.



I tested the system, by rinsing the car with the demineralised filtered water using it in the low-pressure wide spray pattern setting on the gun, then waited for the water to air dry naturally.

The result was a spot free finish as the water evaporates... :)
 
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My neighbour gave me a Mr. Clean carwash system that you attached to the end of the hose. It would dispense foam (you loaded your own soap) and had three setting, plain water, the aforementioned foam, and a rinse, the latter running through filters. The rinse was more of a mist and I would rinse the soap off and then do a final rinse through the filters which dried beautifully without spots. Unfortunately P&G discontinued it and I couldn't get the filters, making the whole thing worthless, although I continued to use the gun for soap and rinse until I forgot about it one winter and it froze and cracked. Given that we have a black Rogue and the royal crimson Mustang, I should look into this as I am always fighting with spots on both vehicles.
 

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The tank I show above can produce between 800-1000 gallons of Demineralizer and deionized water at almost a near 0 TDS rating. The company does a drop off - pickup service when the led light on top turns red.

Here in AZ our water is rich with minerals and is very hard water. With the Puretek system I can wash a vehicle in direct sun on a triple digit day and not worry about spotting.

There are typically three types of water spots, Type I and Type II and Type III. Water spots are the minerals in the water which start reacting to the paint system.

Type I typically can be removed with either a QD, or dedicated water spot remover.

Type II are spots where the minerals have started etching into the clear coat through the corrosive properties. In most cases a compound and polish can remove these. Spots left too long can etch too deep into the clear.

Type III mainly affect single stage paint due to the porous properties.

If you live in an area with hard water, it’s important to get the vehicle dried and not let the water sit.






Please excuse the typos. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@paul_g ... Have you ever thought of taking your part-time detailing business full-time and quitting your day job?

Is it very competitive in your neck of the woods, with bigger players?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
LOL, we like things the way they are currently. :)
Yeah I can understand. :)

I also do detailing part time from home, and thought about doing it full time and opening a proper business front.

Then you have rent, advertising, insurance, wages, etc.
Not to mention extra equipment like a hoist to bring the car up to height while buffing the side panels so you don't wear out your back, banks of infra red lights as required on the pro applications of ceramic coatings, etc, etc.

Then when you consider that it takes 14 - 18 hours to do a full paint correction, ceramic coating and interior cabin detail... You can only do 3 or so cars a week on your own.
Start hiring other detailers or help and there goes the profits. :)

The money and profit is just is not there unless you are able to do exotic cars at $6,000 a detail like some of the few famous detailers. :)
 

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We have a traditional home water softener, so I plumbed into the system and routed it to an additional outside faucet. It's labeled to be unsuitable for plant watering, but it sure does a nice job of supplying spot-free water! Combine it with a leaf blower to push the water off, and you can throw away the chamois.

Nathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We have a traditional home water softener, so I plumbed into the system and routed it to an additional outside faucet. It's labeled to be unsuitable for plant watering, but it sure does a nice job of supplying spot-free water! Combine it with a leaf blower to push the water off, and you can throw away the chamois.

Nathan
So long as your leaf blower is electric and not fuel driven.... You don't want oily residue blown on the clean paintwok. :)
 
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