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My Ecoboost is almost at 30k miles and I have been running the COBB Stage 1 93 Octane tune for about 4 months. I noticed some rougher running and a little hesitation on occasion and decided to replace the plugs. After much research, I decided to order the TUNE + pregapped NGK plugs for our cars. Since I try to do all the work on my cars myself, I installed the plugs today. Not a hard job at all. The original plugs had normal wear for 30k, so no issues there at all.

After the install, fired right up and seemed to idle much smoother. I will update on the effects on MPG and Power later. These are the recommended plugs for future tuning from TUNE +.
 
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I've been running them for about 5000 miles. They've been great.
 
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I think changing the plugs every 30k is a good idea with the Ecoboost. Even more with a tuned car, cheap insurance. Just as going Amsoil full synthetic is also. Since I love to do some high speed runs and having fun embarrassing V8's, a higher maintenance schedule is a must if I want the car to run flawlessly for years.
 
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Checked the gap on the original plugs and they varied between .032 and .034. That is nowhere near what they should be. Glad I changed them.
 
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I think changing the plugs every 30k is a good idea with the Ecoboost. Even more with a tuned car, cheap insurance. Just as going Amsoil full synthetic is also. Since I love to do some high speed runs and having fun embarrassing V8's, a higher maintenance schedule is a must if I want the car to run flawlessly for years.
Embarrassing V8's? ....Surprising them, maybe.
 

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I just installed my 2nd set of the old TUNE+ Spec Denso ITV22's. When I read "NGK" in your title, I thought this had to be a typo so I went to the TUNE+ web site and sure enough he's switched brands. Sounds like it was more of a "supply issue" than an actual issue with the Denso plugs though.

After almost 20k miles, the gap on the 1st set of Denso's had grown from 0.028 to 0.031" and the ground electrode was noticeably worn when comparing to new. Plugs looked good other wise, could maybe have just re-gapped them and re-installed but had the new ones ready to go.

When looking on Adams NGK page, I noticed he states ...

NO DIELECTRIC GREASE
NO ANTI-SEIZE!


... anyone know reasoning behind this ??

A small amount of anti-seize on spark plug threads going into aluminum heads and a small amount of dielectric grease between spark plug boot & porcelain is what I always thought was standard practice.

Another interesting tid bit is it appears that NGK makes the OE Ford Motorcraft CYFS12YPC plugs. Stamped on the side is "ILTR6G8G", "N0078", and JAPAN. The number is similar to the one colder p/n of LTR71X-11 that Adam and others sell, and the "6" vs. "7" in the two part numbers is the heat range ... 7 being colder per NGK site. Even more interesting, NGK shows no available spark plug for either Ecoboost Mustang or Focus RS applications.

Doug
 
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I've always been a firm believer in anti seize on spark plugs then I came across this article...
When replacing the spark plugs, a common mistake people make is use anti-seize on them. Rightly so they want to prevent the plugs from seizing inside the head. Maybe it is a good idea with crappy plugs and an old iron head but you should never do this with a VG30E motor and NGK plugs.



Using anti-seize on spark plugs will do the following:

  • Alters the tightening torque by up to 20% which may cause over-tightening (or breaking the spark bolt)
  • Reduces electrical ground contact if the anti-seize is non-conductive or semi-conductive (reduced spark possible)
  • Isolates more heat into the spark plug therefore causing the plug to increase the heat range above specification (can cause detonation/pre-ignition)
  • Creates a big goopy mess when tightening
The thing with NGK plugs is that they are already self-lubricating and corrosion resistant. They have to be installed dry. Never put anti-seize on them. I used to only coat the washer but as of recently found no need to even do that. Change those plugs once in a while and they will never seize up and you get great gas mileage. Remember to check the gap!
 

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Back in the 70s and 80s when I was racing motor cycles I learned how important anti-seize is when you are threading a steel fastener into an aluminum thread. Even just a few heat cycles and the threads would gall and the fastener would break or the threads would be ripped out.

Back when they first started putting aluminum heads on cars a whole industry developed making tools and inserts to repair damaged spark plug threads, without removing the heads, caused by galling do to the lack of anti-seize. These days most aluminum heads have steel inserts for the spark plug threads that have eliminated most of the issues.

Over my 40+ year engineering career I have learned that there are a lot of similar and dissimilar metals that do not play nice in threaded joints and require anti-seize in order to prevent galling issues.

In regards to the points in the post above.

1. 20% is kind of low, lubricant on a threaded joint can increase the clamping force by up to 40% so you need to be mindful of putting a lubricant on threads with the torque you apply. Example: when I built the 360 in my Barracuda I used ARP fasteners in the bottom end. The ARP instructions said to torque to 120ft-lbs when using the FSM specified motor oil on the threads or 80 ft-lbs when using the ARP moly lube.

2. I have never seen an ant-seize that wasn't metal based so they are electrically conductive. Even if it wasn't, the close contact of the thread faces to each other when torqued results in good contact so electrical conductivity is not an issue.

3. Anti-seize is also very thermally conductive (filled with metal) and potentially can improve the thermal conductivity of the plug to the head by filling up the air gaps at the route of the threads.

Personally I don't use anti-seize on plugs going into iron heads or aluminum heads with steel inserts but if it is aluminum without inserts I use a nickel based anti-seize. I always put dielectric grease in the spark plug boots to prevent them from sticking to the plug and tearing the next time I remove them.





Dave
 

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What is the best tune to get the most to nd torque
Hp and torque
"The Best Tune" is completely subjective and going to be individual to your car. I recommend finding a professional tuner and letting them know what your goals are for the car, then working with them on it. What works for me may not work for you. I have been recommending Tune+ (adamtuned.com) and PD-tuning.com, but a lot of guys also find local tuners willing to dyno tune their cars for more power and torque.
 

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My Ecoboost is almost at 30k miles and I have been running the COBB Stage 1 93 Octane tune for about 4 months. I noticed some rougher running and a little hesitation on occasion and decided to replace the plugs. After much research, I decided to order the TUNE + pregapped NGK plugs for our cars. Since I try to do all the work on my cars myself, I installed the plugs today. Not a hard job at all. The original plugs had normal wear for 30k, so no issues there at all.

After the install, fired right up and seemed to idle much smoother. I will update on the effects on MPG and Power later. These are the recommended plugs for future tuning from TUNE +.
After you installed these plus did you have to retune the car?
 

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After you installed these plus did you have to retune the car?
Unlikely as these plugs can be used on a stock motor
 
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